corollary


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cor·ol·lar·y

 (kôr′ə-lĕr′ē, kŏr′-)
n. pl. cor·ol·lar·ies
1. A proposition that follows with little or no proof required from one already proven.
2. A deduction or an inference.
3. A natural consequence or effect; a result.
adj.
Consequent; resultant.

[Middle English corolarie, from Latin corōllārium, money paid for a garland, gratuity, from corōlla, small garland; see corolla.]

corollary

(kəˈrɒlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
1. (Logic) a proposition that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
2. an obvious deduction
3. a natural consequence or result
adj
consequent or resultant
[C14: from Latin corollārium money paid for a garland, from Latin corolla garland, from corōna crown]

cor•ol•lar•y

(ˈkɔr əˌlɛr i, ˈkɒr-; esp. Brit., kəˈrɒl ə ri)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. Math. a proposition incidentally proved in proving another proposition.
2. an immediate consequence or easily drawn conclusion.
3. a natural consequence or result.
[1325–75; < Late Latin corollārium corollary, in Latin: money paid for a garland, gratuity. See corolla, -ary]

cor·ol·lar·y

(kôr′ə-lĕr′ē)
A statement that follows with little or no proof required from an already proven statement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corollary - a practical consequence that follows naturally; "blind jealousy is a frequent corollary of passionate love"
aftermath, consequence - the outcome of an event especially as relative to an individual
2.corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference

corollary

noun consequence, result, effect, outcome, sequel, end result, upshot The number of prisoners increased as a corollary of the government's crackdown on violent crime.

corollary

noun
Translations
důsledek
Korollar
följdsatskorollarium

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] Ncorolario m

corollary

[kəˈrɒləri] ncorollaire m

corollary

n(logische) Folge, Korollar nt (also Math); this would prove, as a corollary, that …damit würde dann gleichzeitig auch bewiesen, dass …
adjBegleit-

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] ncorollario
References in classic literature ?
She had bowed to the inevitable result of proximity, the necessity of loving him; but she had not calculated upon this sudden corollary, which, indeed, Clare had put before her without quite meaning himself to do it so soon.
As a corollary to that, I would mention two things.
A corollary of this proposition of course was, that any one who refused to receive the new gospel was personally responsible for keeping Jurgis from his heart's desire; and this, alas, made him uncomfortable as an acquaintance.
But underlying this thought, the first and most simple one, no doubt, there was in our opinion another, newer one, a corollary of the first, less easy to perceive and more easy to contest, a view as philosophical and belonging no longer to the priest alone but to the savant and the artist.
A corollary of the highest importance may be deduced from the foregoing remarks, namely, that the structure of every organic being is related, in the most essential yet often hidden manner, to that of all other organic beings, with which it comes into competition for food or residence, or from which it has to escape, or on which it preys.
Baxter had been open at least eight hours by this time, for it was nearly five o'clock; and if people are to quarrel often, it follows as a corollary that their quarrels cannot be protracted beyond certain limits.
As a necessary corollary to this belief, Squire Brown held further that it didn't matter a straw whether his son associated with lords' sons or ploughmen's sons, provided they were brave and honest.
The estimate in Corollary 12 point a) is better than the result given in Theorem 3.
2 still the subordination part of the result holds so we obtain the following corollary as a straight forward consequence to the first part of Theorem 2.
Corollary discharge is a kind of predictive signal generated by the brain that helps to explain, for example, why other people can tickle us but we can't tickle ourselves.
We compare the result of above corollary with the result of Ravichandran et al.