coronach


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coronach

(ˈkɒrənəx; -nək)
n
or Scot and Irish a dirge or lamentation for the dead
[C16: from Scottish Gaelic corranach; related to Irish rānadh a crying]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coronach - a song or hymn of mourning composed or performed as a memorial to a dead person
keen - a funeral lament sung with loud wailing
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
References in periodicals archive ?
Instrumental group Coronach will perform at Nairn Museum on Sunday from 3pm.
Fred Darling Cuttle (1922), Coronach (Cameronian Roussel (l'Eveque (Tudor (1941).
Michael Berkeley's Coronach (written for Presteigne in 1988) has a power that fully engages the emotions, which here reached its pinnacle in leader Anna Smith's intensely poignant solo.
(13) Una vez que Rose narra a Waverley las causas del conflicto entre el baron y el chieftain, y como este en cierta ocasion llego a saldarse con una escaramuza en la que murieron tres highlanders, con el consecuente funeral acompanado del lamento o coronach de las viudas, el narrador destaca como "Waverley could not help starting at a story which bore so much resemblance to one of his own day-dreams" (72; enfasis anadido).
The coal will originate at Westmoreland's Poplar River surface mine in the south-central Saskatchewan town of Coronach. The mine has been supplying coal to SaskPower's Poplar River Generating Station since 1978.
(20) MacDiarmid dedicated to Mac Colla the poem 'Coronach for the End of the World', which was written in 1933, only a year after the publication of Mac Colla's The Albannach, a novel praised by MacDiarmid as 'that remarkable study of our lost Gaelic background, which perhaps is the most radical product of the whole Scots Renaissance Movement to date.
"I was looking back through the record books for the last time Beckhampton (his historic Wiltshire stable) won the Eclipse, through the likes of Noel Murless, but it was back in 1926 through Fred Darling's Coronach, who also won the Derby and the St Leger," said Charlton.
Charlton said: "I was looking back through the record books for the last time Beckhampton (his historic Wiltshire stable) won the Eclipse, through the likes of Noel Murless, but it was back in 1926 through Fred Darling's Coronach, who also won the Derby and the St Leger.
LNER A3 Class nameplate 'Coronach' in November last year for pounds 23,000; A GWR Hall Class nameplate 4982 Acton Hall with its matching cabside numberplate, sold by GWRA for pounds 11,400; GWRA broke the world record for a station totem with this BR (Western Region) station totem sign reading Evercreech Junction, which sold for pounds 8,150; The share certificate - an investment at pounds 20; GWRA set a world record for a contractor-built Pannier Tank cabside plate when 8415, an ex Worcester Pannier Tank locomotive, sold for pounds 2,100; A BR (Midland Region) station totem from Besses o' th' Barn, sold for pounds 4,200; This enamel Fry's Cocoa platform sign sold for pounds 1450; A Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway whistle, sold for pounds 500
he had included in Matthew Lewis' edited collection Tales of Wonder (1801), such as the imitation-medieval ballad "Glenfinlas, or Lord Ronald's Coronach." Kissing the rod, as Wordsworth had done two years before, Scott vowed he had learned his lesson and intended to keep henceforth to "the genuine old English model" (Letter quoted in Gamer 124).
Slip Anchor was the first horse to make all the running in the Derby since Coronach 59 years p r ev ous y.