perfusion

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per·fu·sion

 (pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perfusion - pumping a liquid into an organ or tissue (especially by way of blood vessels)
intromission, insertion, introduction - the act of putting one thing into another
Translations

per·fu·sion

n. perfusión, pasaje de un líquido o sustancia a través de un conducto.

perfusion

n perfusión f
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also the potential for coronary ischemia because you are no longer providing adequate coronary perfusion," he said at the American Heart Association scientific sessions.
Early surgical interventions are advised to correct the coronary steal syndrome and myocardial ischemia, and therefore establish a two coronary perfusion system that is mandatory for long-term survival.
sup][7] Epinephrine has beneficial effects in patients during cardiac arrest, primarily because of its a-adrenergic effects, resulting in improved coronary perfusion pressure which is associated with an increased probability of ROSC in animals and humans.
1) World Health Task Force on Nomenclature defines Myocardial Ischaemia as "Diminished supply of blood in respect to cellular demands caused by coronary perfusion changes.
Beta-blockers and If channel inhibitor can effectively control the heart rate, increase diastolic filling time and improve coronary perfusion.
Killip class [greater than or equal to]3 on admission may be resulted from a larger infarction caused by severe damage to the microvascular bed as well as decreased coronary perfusion pressure.
After equilibration period, to determine the variations in coronary perfusion and systolic pressure, increments in coronary flow were performed (6-14 mL/min).
Methods: Isolated rat hearts with ischemia/reperfusion injury in Langendorff system were employed for examining the effect of total ginsenosides (TGS) on coronary perfusion flow (CPF).
In addition to blood pressure, physicians must be concerned about a patient's coronary perfusion pressure, the pressure at which blood flows through the coronary vessels while the heart is filling with blood between contractions.
Furthermore, the effect of rat calcitonin on coronary perfusion pressure and heart rate has not been studied and little is known on the effect of rat calcitonin on contractile force.