corporally


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cor·po·ral 1

 (kôr′pər-əl, kôr′prəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the body. See Synonyms at bodily.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin corporālis, from corpus, corpor-, body; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots.]

cor′po·ral′i·ty (-pə-răl′ĭ-tē) n.
cor′po·ral·ly adv.

cor·po·ral 2

 (kôr′pər-əl, kôr′prəl)
n.
1.
a. A noncommissioned rank in the US Army that is above private first class and below sergeant.
b. A noncommissioned rank in the US Marine Corps that is above lance corporal and below sergeant.
2. One who holds the rank of corporal.

[Obsolete French, alteration of caporal, from Old Italian caporale, from capo, head, from Latin caput; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·po·ral 3

 (kôr′pər-əl, kôr′prəl)
n. Ecclesiastical
A white linen cloth on which the consecrated elements are placed during the celebration of the Eucharist.

[Middle English, from Old French and from Medieval Latin corporāle, both from Latin corporālis, of the body (the Eucharistic bread being representative of Christ's body), from corpus, corpor-, body; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots.]
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References in classic literature ?
A child of intelligences, remote and unguessable, working corporally in metals, it indubitably was.
Murtagh, Is Corporally Punishing Criminals Degrading?
If likeness reaches its paroxysm in the soul of the saint interiorly united to God, Franciscan experience shows that such a union, and such a degree of likeness, can only be manifested corporally. This is precisely what St.
No one asks the proper questions: Why would a spirit chose to stay in a haunted house anyway, which would - by definition - be corporally crowded with spirits anyway?
(15) If the Eucharist invokes Christ's literal body under the form of bread and wine, he reasons, then the Jewish Passover must have done the same: "Wherefore if you will prove any real and corporal presence of Christ by that place [that is, in the Catholic Mass], you may as well prove that he was corporally present in circumcision, in eating of the paschal lamb, and in baptism, as in the Lords supper." (16) Protestant printer and clergyman Robert Crowley likewise appeals to the Jewish ritual in his argument against transubstantiation: "[H]e offered himselfe figuratiuely in the paschall lambe...
So God employs natural means to maintain the health and life of man, such as sleep, meat, drink, [...] A physician repairs the work of God when damaged corporally; we, divines, spiritually; we mend the soul that the devil has spoiled.
While Wordsworth strove to elicit love as a part of his influence, current poetry "is both more intellectual and more objective." Milsand continues by asserting that present-day English poetry seeks to portray or "to corporally represent ideas people may have about what exists or about what is beautiful and good; it tends to clarify by helping the mind imagine real or conceivable things.
Physical abuses are strictly forbidden in Saudi Arabia in all sectors and teachers who punish students corporally are held accountable.
(55) Accordingly, it has a very broad scope; a significant number of people without a legal relationship to a child, such as a mother's boyfriend, are permitted to corporally punish that child with no criminal liability.
(10) For the right of a victim of theft to corporally punish the thief, see Kinsella (1997, 639; emphasis in original), which argues: "Alternatively, at the victim's option, corporal punishment may be administered by B instead of taking back his own $10,000--indeed, this may be the only option where the thief is penniless or the stolen property is spent or destroyed."
If the globe is associated with the geometrical figure of the sphere and as such is construed as self-contained (geometrically and corporally homo-geneous), the same does not hold for "the world." One need only recall Orson Welles's famous radio adaptation of H.G.