corporate welfare


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corporate welfare

n.
Financial aid, such as a subsidy or tax break, provided by a government to corporations or other businesses, especially when viewed as wasteful or unjust: "critics who say that letting big companies raise private stock on public land amounts to corporate welfare" (Frank Clifford).

cor′porate wel′fare


n.
financial assistance, as tax breaks or subsidies, given by the government esp. to large companies.
[1990–95, Amer.]
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Who else could sell Jim Anderton-esque corporate welfare and Soviet-style economic development as business-friendly in a cool shade of blue?
Philosopher George Santayana warned decades ago that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it, and that certainly rings true with that scourge of free enterprise called corporate welfare or crony capitalism--cozy relationships between government and business designed to thwart competition and ease the way toward success for a favored few.
And so Bennett begins the sordid tale of American corporate welfare and crony capitalism.
Corporate welfare for fatcats milking the system is a larger scandal than any street of benefit fiddlers.
Bennett devotes a chapter to Poletown and eminent domain in his book that traces the history of corporate welfare from Alexander Hamilton at the country's founding to recent debate on funding the Export-Import Bank.
Corporate Welfare does not aim to serve as an overview of corporate welfare; instead, it provides an in-depth study of four specific modern manifestations of corporate welfare.
Koch said, 'The big banks have been among the biggest proponents of corporate welfare.
org/multimedia/daily-podcast/plea-end-corporate-welfare Crony capitalism, corporate welfare or corporatism.
In the last 35 years, states, counties, and cities have enacted 240 "megadeals"--amounting to at least $75 million apiece--that dole out corporate welfare in hopes of spurring "economic development.
Corporate welfare occurs when employers work the system with their remorseless claims to have created jobs, when in fact they are just transferring a growing chunk of their wages bill onto the state, who in turn have to raise taxes from the middle classes and small businesses.
Corporate welfare describes public policies that directly or indirectly meet the specific needs and/or preferences of private businesses.
Corporate welfare is built into the federal tax code.