corporatist

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cor·po·ra·tist

 (kôr′pər-ə-tĭst′, kôr′prə-tĭst′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a corporative state or system.

cor′po·ra·tism n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corporatist - a supporter of corporatism
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
Adj.1.corporatist - of or relating to corporatism
Translations

corporatist

[ˈkɔːpərətɪst] ADJ [theory, tendencies] → corporativista
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, it was often the advocates of a more strictly pluralist conception of political economy, rather than corporatists, who called on the state to play a more interventionist role in industrial relations.
The rent-a-mob demonstrators and their antics make the one-world corporatists appear conservative, reasonable, and responsible by comparison.
The corporatists argue that we have to leave things to the CEOs of AT&T and Scott Paper, that we cannot possibly have ordinary people - through their elected officials - get involved in the process.
He is similarly uneasy with the categorization of Hoffman as a "corporate liberal,' correctly noting that Hoffman, unlike many European corporatists, believed firmly in economic competition and distrusted the power of the state.
"They" are the political corporatists in your midst, such as the Heritage and Cato groups and the trade associations and corporate law firms filled with well-paid persons, who concoct schemes designed to leave Americans defenseless against hazards to their safety and their family budgets.
The resistance is this permanent political class, this combination of lobbyists, and consultants and corporatists and globalist elites.
Tell that to the Koch brothers and other corporatists who spend millions to influence every election.
Corporatists argued that the modern capitalist economy lacked leadership and direction.
In the United States, this corporatism began to grow in the postwar years and manifested itself by firms losing control to outside government oversight, labor unions, and community stakeholders--unlike the socialists, the corporatists found that they could exert control without exercising outright ownership.
There is a shadow government in operation that only cares about foreign affairs and is run by the corporatists and elitists throughout the world.
It's the right-wing that is being split, and that's historically been the case--the corporatists make sure authentic conservatives are vectored in other directions.
The right-moving trend of the mainstream media, absurdly deemed liberal by successfully intimidating corporatists and ideological aggressors, continues year after year.