corrected


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Related to corrected: I stand corrected

cor·rect

 (kə-rĕkt′)
v. cor·rect·ed, cor·rect·ing, cor·rects
v.tr.
1.
a. To make or put right: correct a mistake; correct a misunderstanding.
b. To remove the errors or mistakes from: corrected her previous testimony.
c. To indicate or mark the errors in: correct an exam.
2.
a. To speak to or communicate with (someone) in order to point out a mistake or error.
b. To scold or punish so as to improve or reform.
3. To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example): The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.
4. To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition: correct the wheel alignment on a car.
v.intr.
1. To make corrections.
2. To make adjustments; compensate: correcting for the effects of air resistance.
adj.
1. Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
2. Conforming to standards; proper: correct behavior.

[Middle English correcten, from Latin corrigere, corrēct- : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·rect′a·ble, cor·rect′i·ble adj.
cor·rect′ly adv.
cor·rect′ness n.
cor·rec′tor n.
Synonyms: correct, rectify, remedy, redress, revise, amend
These verbs mean to make right what is wrong. Correct refers to eliminating faults, errors, or defects: I corrected the spelling mistakes. The new design corrected the flaws in the earlier version.
Rectify stresses the idea of bringing something into conformity with a standard of what is right: "It is dishonest to claim that we can rectify racial injustice without immediate cost" (Mari J. Matsuda).
Remedy involves removing or counteracting something considered a cause of harm, damage, or discontent: He took courses to remedy his abysmal ignorance.
Redress refers to setting right something considered immoral or unethical and usually involves some kind of recompense: "They said he had done very little to redress the abuses that the army had committed against the civilian population" (Daniel Wilkinson).
Revise suggests change that results from careful reconsideration: The agency revised its safety recommendations in view of the new findings.
Amend implies improvement through alteration or correction: "Whenever [the people] shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it" (Abraham Lincoln).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.corrected - having something undesirable neutralized; "with glasses her corrected vision was 20:20"
uncorrected - left faulty or wrong; "uncorrected astigmatism"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Then if there are any imperfections in the constitutions of states (and that many such exist the diversity of constitutions is alone sufficient to assure us), custom has without doubt materially smoothed their inconveniences, and has even managed to steer altogether clear of, or insensibly corrected a number which sagacity could not have provided against with equal effect; and, in fine, the defects are almost always more tolerable than the change necessary for their removal; in the same manner that highways which wind among mountains, by being much frequented, become gradually so smooth and commodious, that it is much better to follow them than to seek a straighter path by climbing over the tops of rocks and descending to the bottoms of precipices.
Watching in it, in the way we have suggested, the contention of those two men, those two minds in him, and observing how the one might have ascertained and corrected the shortcomings of the other, we certainly understand, and can sympathize with Amiel's despondency in the retrospect of a life which seemed to have been but imperfectly occupied.
A young man whom he had once corrected had christened him, half jestingly, Sir Galahad, and certainly his life in London, a life which had to bear all the while the test of the limelight, had appeared to merit some such title.
I've nothing to say against the fellow," he remarked, "except that it seems queer nowadays to run up against a man of his birth who is not a sportsman,--in the sense of being fond of sport, I mean," he corrected himself quickly.
Reference 2 was corrected to "Guaraldi G, Baraboutis IG.
8% of patients with completely corrected anemia developed kidney failure, compared with 21% of patients with partially corrected anemia; * 94.
2 : to change or adjust so as to bring to some standard or to a required condition <My watch was slow, so I corrected it.
The Department of Labor issued an updated version of its Voluntary Fiduciary Correction Program in April, adding transactions that can be corrected under the program and expanding the ability to obtain relief from prohibited transactions.
Over all, the instructor implicitly corrected 19 times in the FMF group, and 15 times for the MF group.
On the other hand, an ECB--Department of Buildings violation can have a minimum penalty of $800 and require the violation to be Certified Corrected at the Department of Buildings.
A plan document failure generally can be corrected by amending the plan.
When I use the term "Corrected" I will be referring to the ABG values as corrected to the patient's body temperature by the blood gas analyzer and "non-corrected" will refer to the ABG analyzer readings at 37[degrees]C.