corrective


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cor·rec·tive

 (kə-rĕk′tĭv)
adj.
Tending or intended to correct: corrective lenses.
n.
An agent that corrects.

cor·rec′tive·ly adv.

corrective

(kəˈrɛktɪv)
adj
tending or intended to correct
n
something that tends or is intended to correct
corˈrectively adv

cor•rec•tive

(kəˈrɛk tɪv)

adj.
1. tending to correct.
n.
2. a means of correcting.
[1525–35; (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin]
cor•rec′tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corrective - a device for treating injury or diseasecorrective - a device for treating injury or disease
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
pack - a sheet or blanket (either dry or wet) to wrap around the body for its therapeutic effect
face pack, pack - a cream that cleanses and tones the skin
pick-me-up, pickup - anything with restorative powers; "she needed the pickup that coffee always gave her"
prosthesis, prosthetic device - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the body
Adj.1.corrective - designed to promote discipline; "the teacher's action was corrective rather than instructional"; "disciplinal measures"; "the mother was stern and disciplinary"
nonindulgent, strict - characterized by strictness, severity, or restraint
2.corrective - tending or intended to correct or counteract or restore to a normal condition; "corrective measures"; "corrective lenses"
bettering - changing for the better

corrective

adjective
1. remedial, therapeutic, palliative, restorative, rehabilitative He has received extensive corrective surgery to his skull.
2. disciplinary, punitive, penal, reformatory He was placed in a corrective institution for children.

corrective

adjectivenoun
Something that corrects or counteracts:
Translations
مُخَفِّف ، مُصَحِّـح
nápravný
forbedrendekorrigerende
leiîréttingar-; betrunar-
düzelticiıslah edici

corrective

[kəˈrektɪv]
A. ADJcorrectivo
B. Ncorrectivo m
C. CPD corrective glasses NPLgafas fpl correctoras
corrective surgery Ncirugía f correctiva

corrective

adjkorrigierend; to take corrective actionkorrigierend eingreifen; to have corrective surgerysich einem korrigierenden Eingriff unterziehen
n (Pharm, fig) → Korrektiv nt

corrective

[kəˈrɛktɪv]
1. adj (surgery) → correttivo/a
2. ncorrettivo

correct

(kəˈrekt) verb
1. to remove faults and errors from. These spectacles will correct his eye defect.
2. (of a teacher etc) to mark errors in. I have fourteen exercise books to correct.
adjective
1. free from faults or errors. This sum is correct.
2. right; not wrong. Did I get the correct idea from what you said?; You are quite correct.
corˈrection (-ʃən) noun
corˈrective (-tiv) adjective
setting right. corrective treatment.
corˈrectly adverb
corˈrectness noun

corrective

adj corrector
References in classic literature ?
I believe I made a mistake in beginning to write them, anyway I have felt ashamed all the time I've been writing this story; so it's hardly literature so much as a corrective punishment.
When a young gentleman like Dunsey is reduced to so exceptional a mode of locomotion as walking, a whip in his hand is a desirable corrective to a too bewildering dreamy sense of unwontedness in his position; and Dunstan, as he went along through the gathering mist, was always rapping his whip somewhere.
She consulted the glass once more--gave one or two corrective touches to her hair and her cap--and hastened into the boudoir.
Clearly, she was the impulse, and he the corrective.
said the king, smiling; "for the second part of my sentence will serve as a corrective to the first.
Bulstrode; "but trial, my dear sir, is our portion here, and is a needed corrective.
For that,' Mr Wegg inwardly decides, as he takes a corrective sniff or two, 'is musty, leathery, feathery, cellary, gluey, gummy, and,' with another sniff, 'as it might be, strong of old pairs of bellows.
Not even doing that much, so that the old lady were busy and pleased, he would quietly swallow what was given him, merely taking a corrective dip of hands and face into the great bowl of dried rose-leaves, and into the other great bowl of dried lavender, and then would go out, as confident in the sweetening powers of Cloisterham Weir and a wholesome mind, as Lady Macbeth was hopeless of those of all the seas that roll.
Before her husband's corrective voice could apply a fresh stimulant, Magdalen took her compassionately by the arm and led her out of the room.
An interval of meditation, serious and grateful, was the best corrective of everything dangerous in such high-wrought felicity; and she went to her room, and grew steadfast and fearless in the thankfulness of her enjoyment.
Which belief I take to be a wholesome corrective of all political opinions, and, if held sincerely, to make all opinions equally harmless, whether they be blue, red, or green.
That is only the natural consequence of a legal marriage, so to say, its corrective, a protest.

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