corruption

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cor·rup·tion

 (kə-rŭp′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of corrupting.
b. The state of being corrupt.
2. Decay; rot.

corruption

(kəˈrʌpʃən)
n
1. the act of corrupting or state of being corrupt
2. moral perversion; depravity
3. dishonesty, esp bribery
4. putrefaction or decay
5. (Linguistics) alteration, as of a manuscript
6. (Linguistics) an altered form of a word
corˈruptionist n

cor•rup•tion

(kəˈrʌp ʃən)

n.
1. the act of corrupting or the state of being corrupt.
2. moral perversion; depravity.
3. perversion of integrity.
4. corrupt or dishonest proceedings.
6. debasement or alteration, as of language or a text.
7. an altered or debased form of a word.
8. putrefactive decay; rottenness.
9. any corrupting influence or agency.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin]
cor•rup′tion•ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corruption - lack of integrity or honesty (especially susceptibility to bribery); use of a position of trust for dishonest gain
infection - moral corruption or contamination; "ambitious men are led astray by an infection that is almost unavoidable"
venality - prostitution of talents or offices or services for reward
dishonesty - the quality of being dishonest
jobbery - corruptness among public officials
2.corruption - in a state of progressive putrefaction
putrefaction, rot - a state of decay usually accompanied by an offensive odor
3.corruption - decay of matter (as by rot or oxidation)
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
4.corruption - moral perversion; impairment of virtue and moral principles; "the luxury and corruption among the upper classes"; "moral degeneracy followed intellectual degeneration"; "its brothels, its opium parlors, its depravity"; "Rome had fallen into moral putrefaction"
immorality - the quality of not being in accord with standards of right or good conduct; "the immorality of basing the defense of the West on the threat of mutual assured destruction"
5.corruption - destroying someone's (or some group's) honesty or loyalty; undermining moral integrity; "corruption of a minor"; "the big city's subversion of rural innocence"
degradation, debasement - changing to a lower state (a less respected state)
6.corruption - inducement (as of a public official) by improper means (as bribery) to violate duty (as by commiting a felony); "he was held on charges of corruption and racketeering"
inducing, inducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"

corruption

noun
1. dishonesty, fraud, fiddling (informal), graft (informal), bribery, extortion, profiteering, breach of trust, venality, shady dealings (informal), crookedness (informal), shadiness He faces 54 charges of corruption and tax evasion.
3. distortion, doctoring, falsification The name `Santa Claus' is a corruption of `Saint Nicholas'.
Quotations
"Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
"All rising to great place is by a winding stair" [Francis Bacon Essays]
Proverbs
"One rotten apple spoils the barrel"

corruption

noun
2. Departure from what is legally, ethically, and morally correct:
Informal: crookedness.
3. A term that offends against established usage standards:
Translations
فَسَادفَساد، تَعَفُّـنكَلِمَـه مُحرَّفـه
korupcezkaženostzkomolenina
korruptionsvindelforvanskning
korruptio
korupcija
elferdített alakkorrupció
afbökunspilling
腐敗行為
타락
skomolenina
podkupovanje
korruption
การทุจริต
ayart mabozulmuş biçimrüşvetçilikyozlaşma
sự tham nhũng

corruption

[kəˈrʌpʃən] N
1. (= depravity) → perversión f, corrupción f
2. (= dishonesty) → corrupción f, venalidad f
3. [of language] → corrupción f (Comput) [of text, file] → corrupción f

corruption

[kəˈrʌpʃən] n
[person, organization] → corruption f
[data] → altération f (de données)

corruption

n
(= act, of person) → Korruption f; (by bribery also) → Bestechung f; (Comput, of data) → Zerstörung f
(= corrupt nature)Verdorbenheit f, → Verderbtheit f; (by bribery) → Bestechlichkeit f; (of morals)Verfall m; (of language, text)Korrumpierung f
(form, = decay of bodies etc) → Zersetzung f, → Fäulnis f

corruption

[kəˈrʌpʃn] ncorruzione f

corrupt

(kəˈrapt) verb
to make or become evil or bad. He was corrupted by the bad influence of two friends.
adjective
1. bad or evil. The government is corrupt.
2. impure. a corrupt form of English.
corˈruptible adjective
corˌruptiˈbility noun
corˈruption (-ʃən) noun
1. the act of corrupting.
2. a word that has changed considerably from its original form. Caterpillar is probably a corruption of the Old French word `chatepelose' meaning `hairy cat'.

corruption

فَسَاد korupce korruption Korruption διαφθορά corrupción korruptio corruption korupcija corruzione 腐敗行為 타락 corruptie korrupsjon korupcja corrupção коррупция korruption การทุจริต yozlaşma sự tham nhũng 腐败
References in classic literature ?
They ascribe the known difficulty one people have to understand another to corruptions and dialects.
I shame to speak I shame to think of the corruptions which have rushed in upon us even like a flood.
But they thought the want of moral virtues was so far from being supplied by superior endowments of the mind, that employments could never be put into such dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified; and, at least, that the mistakes committed by ignorance, in a virtuous disposition, would never be of such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the practices of a man, whose inclinations led him to be corrupt, and who had great abilities to manage, to multiply, and defend his corruptions.
It is true that this people has a natural disposition to goodness; they are very liberal of their alms, they much frequent their churches, and are very studious to adorn them; they practise fasting and other mortifications, and notwithstanding their separation from the Roman Church, and the corruptions which have crept into their faith, yet retain in a great measure the devout fervour of the primitive Christians.
To ascertain the precise point of division between the genuine institutions of Christianity and the corruptions accumulated upon them in the progress of fifteen centuries, was found a task of extreme difficulty throughout the Christian world.
A republic of this kind, able to withstand an external force, may support itself without any internal corruptions.
Your ignorance proves you to be a flawless diamond; historical corruptions do not enter your mind.
The consort of Governor Shute, moreover, had been as a mother to her childhood, and was now anxious to receive her, in the hope that a beautiful young woman would be exposed to infinitely less peril from the primitive society of New England than amid the artifices and corruptions of a court.
Now the corruptions attending each of these governments are these; a kingdom may degenerate into a tyranny, an aristocracy into an oligarchy, and a state into a democracy.
Casaubon aimed) that all the mythical systems or erratic mythical fragments in the world were corruptions of a tradition originally revealed.