corselet

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cor·se·let

 (kôr′slĭt)
n.
1. also cors·let (kôr′slĭt) Body armor, especially a breastplate.
2. also cor·se·lette (kôr′sə-lĕt′) An undergarment that is a combination of a light corset and a brassiere.

[French, diminutive of Old French cors, body; see corset.]

corselet

(ˈkɔːslɪt)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) Also spelt: corslet a piece of armour for the top part of the body
2. (Clothing & Fashion) Also spelt: corselette a one-piece foundation garment, usually combining a brassiere and a corset
[C15: from Old French, from cors bodice of a garment, from Latin corpus body]

cor•se•let

(ˌkɔr səˈlɛt for 1; ˈkɔrs lɪt for 2 )

n.
1. Also, cor`se•lette′. a woman's lightweight foundation garment combining a brassiere and girdle.
2.
a. a suit of light armor covering the entire trunk.
[1490–1500; < Middle French, =cors bodice, body + -elet -let]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corselet - a piece of body armor for the trunkcorselet - a piece of body armor for the trunk; usually consists of a breastplate and back piece
body armor, body armour, cataphract, coat of mail, suit of armor, suit of armour - armor that protects the wearer's whole body
Translations

corselet

n
(= corset)Korselett nt
References in classic literature ?
He, seeing this grotesque figure clad in armour that did not match any more than his saddle, bridle, lance, buckler, or corselet, was not at all indisposed to join the damsels in their manifestations of amusement; but, in truth, standing in awe of such a complicated armament, he thought it best to speak him fairly, so he said, "Senor Caballero, if your worship wants lodging, bating the bed (for there is not one in the inn) there is plenty of everything else here." Don Quixote, observing the respectful bearing of the Alcaide of the fortress (for so innkeeper and inn seemed in his eyes), made answer, "Sir Castellan, for me anything will suffice, for
Perhaps, too, some warlike captain, dressed in his buff coat, with a corselet beneath it, accompanied the governor and councillors.
Some wore a corselet of pieces of hard wood laced together with bear grass, so as to form a light coat of mail, pliant to the body; and a kind of casque of cedar bark, leather, and bear grass, sufficient to protect the head from an arrow or war club.