Corse

(redirected from corses)
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Related to corses: courses

corse

 (kôrs)
n. Archaic
A corpse.

[Middle English cors, from Old French, from Latin corpus; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots.]

corse

(kɔːs)
n
an archaic word for corpse

Corse

(kɔrs)
n
(Placename) the French name for Corsica

corpse

(kɔrps)

n.
1. a dead body, usu. of a human being.
2. Obs. a human or animal body, whether alive or dead.
[1225–75; Middle English corps; orig. sp. variant of cors corse but the p is now sounded]
syn: See body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corse - an island in the MediterraneanCorse - an island in the Mediterranean; with adjacent islets it constitutes a region of France
Mediterranean, Mediterranean Sea - the largest inland sea; between Europe and Africa and Asia
2.Corse - a region of France on the island of Corsica; birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte
Armata Corsa, Corsican Army - a terrorist organization founded in 1999 to oppose the link between nationalists and the Corsican mafia; "the attacks of Armata Corsa are aimed at symbolic targets of colonialism in Corsica"
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
References in classic literature ?
'Twas not those souls that fled in pain, Which to their corses came again, But a troop of spirits blest:
When her own brother slain in battle lay Unsepulchered, she suffered not his corse To lie for carrion birds and dogs to maul: Should not her name (they cry) be writ in gold?
Well, in attendance on my liege, your lord, I crossed the plain to its utmost margin, where The corse of Polyneices, gnawn and mauled, Was lying yet.
Mad mourners of a corse! The troubled plumes of midnight shook
And now it is the time; from Hell's abyss Come thirsting Tantalus, come Sisyphus Heaving the cruel stone, come Tityus With vulture, and with wheel Ixion come, And come the sisters of the ceaseless toil; And all into this breast transfer their pains, And (if such tribute to despair be due) Chant in their deepest tones a doleful dirge Over a corse unworthy of a shroud.
'For my sake--for mine, Lenville--forego all idle forms, unless you would see me a blighted corse at your feet.'
And the dumb river shall receive your corse And wash it all unheeded to the sea.