cosmogony

(redirected from cosmogonists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cos·mog·o·ny

 (kŏz-mŏg′ə-nē)
n. pl. cos·mog·o·nies
1.
a. The astrophysical study of the origin and evolution of the universe.
b. A specific theory or model of the origin and evolution of the universe.
2. A philosophical, religious, or mythical explanation of the origin of the universe.

cos′mo·gon′ic (-mə-gŏn′ĭk), cos′mo·gon′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·gon′i·cal·ly adv.
cos·mog′o·nist n.

cosmogony

(kɒzˈmɒɡənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Philosophy) the study of the origin and development of the universe or of a particular system in the universe, such as the solar system
2. (Philosophy) a theory of such an origin or evolution
[C17: from Greek kosmogonia, from cosmo- + gonos creation]
cosˈmogonal adj
cosmogonic, ˌcosmoˈgonical adj
cosˈmogonist n

cos•mog•o•ny

(kɒzˈmɒg ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
a theory or story of the origin and development of the universe, a solar system, etc.
[1860–65; < Greek kosmogonía creation of the world. See cosmo-, -gony]
cos`mo•gon′ic (-məˈgɒn ɪk) adj.
cos•mog′o•nist, n.

cosmogony

1. a theory about the origin and the evolution of the universe.
2. the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution of specific astronomical systems and the universe as a whole.
3. cosmology. — cosmogonist, n. — cosmogonic, adj.
See also: Cosmology

cosmogony

The study of the origin and development of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmogony - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
big bang theory, big-bang theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe originated sometime between 10 billion and 20 billion years ago from the cataclysmic explosion of a small volume of matter at extremely high density and temperature
nebular hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system evolved from a hot gaseous nebula
planetesimal hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system was formed by the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals
continuous creation theory, steady state theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe maintains a constant average density with matter created to fill the void left by galaxies that are receding from each other; "the steady state theory has been abandoned in favor of the big bang theory"
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
cosmic string, string - (cosmology) a hypothetical one-dimensional subatomic particle having a concentration of energy and the dynamic properties of a flexible loop
CBR, CMB, CMBR, cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ylem - (cosmology) the original matter that (according to the big bang theory) existed before the formation of the chemical elements
dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
Translations

cosmogony

[kɒzˈmɒgənɪ] Ncosmogonía f

cosmogony

nKosmogonie f
References in classic literature ?
It makes the works of God a mere mockery and deception; I would almost as soon believe with the old and ignorant cosmogonists, that fossil shells had never lived, but had been created in stone so as to mock the shells now living on the sea-shore.
The old cosmogonists expressed this by the statement 'In the Beginning was the Word'" (1990 115).
(While objects within the Universe cannot move relative to one another more rapidly than the speed of light, the Universe as a whole could theoretically expand at any speed.) This period of expansion can be used to explain some characteristics of the Universe that the classical big bang theory cannot, but the details are elusive, and the concept of an inflationary universe is still being worked on by cosmogonists.