cosmography


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cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f

cosmography

nKosmografie f

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
References in classic literature ?
From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
Milanesi explains that an Argonaut, most of whom came from Paris, Venice and Rome, was a person who worked in cosmography, besides being a subscriber to Coronelli's Biblioteca Universale, an unfinished holyprofane encyclopedia, with alphabetized entries, the compilation of which took up 30 years of Coronelli's life.
Highlights from later periods include an ancient astrolabe, part of a display showing the science of cosmography, a red Chinese lacquer chest of drawers produced in France by Bernard II van Risenburgh, which shows the cross-cultural inspirations born from global trade routes, and Giovanni Bellini's 'Madonna and Child', representing the emergence of religious art and iconography, said the Wam report.
In chapter four, on Hamlet, Schreyer explains how Shakespeare recycles the sights and sounds of purgatory as represented in Last Judgment plays--namely the under stage space that was part of the tripartite cosmography used in medieval drama.
These overlapping harmonies are illustrated both in the cosmography of Magnus Ferguson, as discovered by another character named Magnus Ferguson, where each planet has a different sort of knowledge, as well as the stories Pfitz tells in a dungeon, which similarly overlap.
Among the subjects included in this singular catalogue are: lyric and epic poetry, drama, theology, civil and canon law, political science, geology, grammar and orthography, cosmography, astronomy, geometry, trigonometry, arithmetic, physics, metallurgy, navigation, poliorcetics (i.
Native American cosmography consists of six directions: east, south, west, north, above, and below.
This concept seems to be an extension of Alexander von Humboldt's idea of cosmography as the science dealing with natural phenomena considered in their particular uniqueness, without a need to extract from the particular the general law.
During the visit, curators presented HH Sheikha Moza with several noteworthy collection items, including a beautifully illustrated copy of a text on cosmography and natural history, various maps of the region and the earliest recorded copy of Archimides' treatise on water-clocks.
Linking Cide Hamete's motives and cosmography, de Armas maintains that Don Quixote's melancholy is guided by Saturn, the planet that grants wisdom through pain and travails.
There was once a barrel-maker and demagogue named Bernadino, who, in the realm of cosmography, professed a belief that the world was an enormous tunnel of marmalade, and in the realm of politics insisted that the throne should belong to the people.