cosmography


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cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cosmography

nKosmografie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
They double the Cape.--The Forecastle.--A Course of Cosmography by Professor Joe.--Concerning the Method of guiding Balloons.--How to seek out Atmospheric Currents.--Eureka.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
and who more gallant and courteous than Ruggiero, from whom the dukes of Ferrara of the present day are descended, according to Turpin in his 'Cosmography.' All these knights, and many more that I could name, senor curate, were knights-errant, the light and glory of chivalry.
Not long he stay'd within his quiet house, To rest his bones after his weary toil; But new exploits do hale him out again: And, mounted then upon a dragon's back, That with his wings did part the subtle air, He now is gone to prove cosmography, That measures coasts and kingdoms of the earth; And, as I guess, will first arrive at Rome, To see the Pope and manner of his court, And take some part of holy Peter's feast, The which this day is highly solemniz'd.
In the context of the Renaissance notion of cosmography, that pictures are a model of the world, the tarot developed.
Milanesi explains that an Argonaut, most of whom came from Paris, Venice and Rome, was a person who worked in cosmography, besides being a subscriber to Coronelli's Biblioteca Universale, an unfinished holyprofane encyclopedia, with alphabetized entries, the compilation of which took up 30 years of Coronelli's life.
Abu Dhabi: Before moving on to the last wing of galleries at the Louvre Abu Dhabi, it is important to spend some time in an unnumbered gallery, titled Cosmography.
The inaugural installation will take visitors on a chronological journey from prehistory to the present day, encompassing 12 chapters including the birth of the first villages, universal religions, cosmography, the magnificence of the royal court, and the modern world, said the Wam report.
These overlapping harmonies are illustrated both in the cosmography of Magnus Ferguson, as discovered by another character named Magnus Ferguson, where each planet has a different sort of knowledge, as well as the stories Pfitz tells in a dungeon, which similarly overlap.
When the mood did lighten, as in Weelkes' Thule, the Period of Cosmography and The Andalusian Merchant (both alive with wordpainting and onomatopoeia), Skidmore seemed reluctant to engage in the fun of really hard consonants; and the yips and yells in Zespedes' Convidando esta la noche should have been thrown off with much greater abandon.