cosmological principle


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cosmological principle

n
(Astronomy) astronomy the theory that the universe is uniform, homogenous, and isotropic, and therefore appears the same from any position
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References in periodicals archive ?
From these equations, simplified by the cosmological principle for the homogeneous and isotropic universe, Einstein first derived the stationary model universe by introducing a hypothetical cosmological constant for incorporating Mach's principle.
Here are some examples: The Anthropic Cosmological Principle, (1) Universes, (2) The Accidental Universe, (3) The Cosmic Blueprint, (4) Cosmic Coincidences, (5) The Anthropic Principle: Man as the Focal Point of Nature, (6) Universal Constants in Physics, (7) The Goldilocks Enigma: Why Is the University Just Right for Life?, (8) Cosmic Jackpot: Why Our Universe Is Just Right for Life, (9) The Constants of Nature: The Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe, (10) Why the Universe Is the Way It Is, (11) Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces That Shape the Universe, (12) and A Fine Tuned Universe: The Quest for God in Science and Theology.
It is known that the Cosmological Principle for the uniform matter distribution not only leads to the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker nonstatic solution, but gives the Einstein's static universe as well [15].
The currently accepted standard big bang model of the universe (BBU) stands on two bases, which are (1) Einstein's general relativity (GR) that describes the effect of matter on spacetime and (2) the cosmological principle (CP) of spacetime isotropy and homogeneity that generates the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric of spacetime [1-4].
It is sometimes generalized as the "cosmological principle," which holds that there are no special locations in the cosmos.
That size limit was derived from (http://arxiv.org/abs/1001.0617) a model published in 2010, as part of an attempt to flesh out the "cosmological principle," which basically says that on a large scale, the universe looks the same in all directions for any observer 6 not so much in terms of physical structures being exactly the same, but in that the physical laws we're familiar with in our corner of the galaxy are fairly constant.
We assume a constant (low) mass density p throughout the universe (cosmological principle).
Phaedrus's "first eulogy of Eros" takes the lover-beloved relationship as metaphor for citizen and city in a "naturalistic account of the political things." The contradiction in that position is the affirmation of generation and corruption united by art, and yet he treats "becoming as a cosmological principle" by nature.
Even though Western science removed humanity from the center of the universe, remnants of an anthropocentrism in which humanity plays an important role in the universe may be seen in the anthropic cosmological principle (Barrow & Tippler, 1986).
This means that the root fire is above all a sort of cosmological principle, a force, a continuous process.
There has been considerable debate lately in the physics community over an idea called the "anthropic cosmological principle" (Barrow and Tipler, 1986; Barrow, 2002; Susskind, 2003).