cosmology

(redirected from cosmologically)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cos·mol·o·gy

 (kŏz-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. cos·mol·o·gies
1. The study of the physical universe considered as a totality of phenomena in time and space.
2.
a. The astrophysical study of the history, structure, and constituent dynamics of the universe.
b. A specific theory or model of this structure and these dynamics.
3. A philosophical, religious, or mythical explanation of the nature and structure of the universe.

cos′mo·log′ic (-mə-lŏj′ĭk), cos′mo·log′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
cos·mol′o·gist n.

cosmology

(kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) the philosophical study of the origin and nature of the universe
2. (Astronomy) the branch of astronomy concerned with the evolution and structure of the universe
3. (Philosophy) a particular account of the origin or structure of the universe: Ptolemaic cosmology.
4. (Astronomy) a particular account of the origin or structure of the universe: Ptolemaic cosmology.
cosmological, ˌcosmoˈlogic adj
ˌcosmoˈlogically adv
cosˈmologist n

cos•mol•o•gy

(kɒzˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the branch of philosophy dealing with the origin and general structure of the universe, esp. with such of its characteristics as space, time, causality, and freedom.
2. the branch of astronomy that deals with the general structure and evolution of the universe.
[1650–60; < New Latin cosmologia. See cosmo-, -logy]
cos•mol′o•gist, n.
cos`mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) cos`mo•log′ic, adj.
cos`mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.

cos·mol·o·gy

(kŏz-mŏl′ə-jē)
The branch of astronomy that deals with the origin, evolution, and structure of the universe.

cosmology

- The study of the world as a totality of all phenomena in space and time.
See also related terms for phenomena.

Cosmology

See also astronomy; planets; sun.

a 19th-century theory about cosmic evolution, developed from contemporary science, that regards the cosmos as self-existent and self-acting. — cosmist, n.
1. a theory about the origin and the evolution of the universe.
2. the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution of specific astronomical systems and the universe as a whole.
3. cosmology. — cosmogonist, n. — cosmogonic, adj.
1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
1. the branch of astronomy that studies the overall structure of the physical universe.
2. the branch of philosophy that studies the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe, especially such characteristics as space, time, causality, and freedom. — cosmologic, cosmological, adj. — cosmologist, n.
the concept that the universe and God are identical; pantheism. — cosmotheist, n.
the concept of the cosmos as alive.
the belief concerning the creation by a transcendant God of the universe, matter, and living organisms out of nothing. — creationist, n.
1. the concept that the earth is the center of the universe.
2. Astronomy. the measurements or observations that are relative to the center of the earth. — geocentric, adj.
1. the concept that the sun is the center of the universe.
2. Astronomy. the measurements or observations that are relative to the center of the sun. Also heliocentricity.heliocentric, adj.
the theory that the totality of existence comprises only the physical universe in time and space. — pancosmic, adj.
a Gnostic theory that considered Satan’s to be the controlling will of the universe.
the philosophical theory of Herbert Spencer that cosmic evolution is cyclic, controlled by mechanical forces which tend toward equilibrium and relative complexity until a peak is reached, after which dissolution occurs, the universe reverts to a simple state, and the cycle begins again. — Spencerian, n., adj.
the belief that purpose and design control the development of the universe and are apparent through natural phenomena. — teleologist, n. — teleology, n.
the science of the universe. — universologist, n.

cosmology

1. The study of the origin, nature, structure, or evolution of the universe.
2. The study of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmology - the metaphysical study of the origin and nature of the universe
metaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowing
2.cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
big bang theory, big-bang theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe originated sometime between 10 billion and 20 billion years ago from the cataclysmic explosion of a small volume of matter at extremely high density and temperature
nebular hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system evolved from a hot gaseous nebula
planetesimal hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system was formed by the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals
continuous creation theory, steady state theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe maintains a constant average density with matter created to fill the void left by galaxies that are receding from each other; "the steady state theory has been abandoned in favor of the big bang theory"
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
cosmic string, string - (cosmology) a hypothetical one-dimensional subatomic particle having a concentration of energy and the dynamic properties of a flexible loop
CBR, CMB, CMBR, cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ylem - (cosmology) the original matter that (according to the big bang theory) existed before the formation of the chemical elements
dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
Translations
kosmologie
kosmologia
kozmologija
kosmologi
kozmológia
kozmologija
kosmologi

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ] Ncosmología f

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒi] n
(= theory) → cosmologie f
(= study) → cosmologie f

cosmology

nKosmologie f

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ] ncosmologia
References in periodicals archive ?
A few of these lenses could magnify exceedingly rare--and cosmologically invaluable--distant supernovae.
For $12,500, for example, the cosmologically minded can send their DNA (a mouth swab or hair sample) into space on a"true mission of exploration," aboard a spacecraft on a"permanent celestial journey well beyond the moon.
Unequivocally categorised by Semple as the 'most important geographical boundary', (13) this liminal space had to be transversed by all seafarers, a cosmologically symbolic act that helps explain the rituals attached to any sea-borne departures, especially the launching of boats.
It is cosmologically dynamic in the sense that the ideas drawn upon by the Oksapmin to explain these related crises demonstrate the continuing efficacy of local autochthonous entities as well as people's ongoing ritualized and magical engagement with them.
The consequence is that what had once been a bundled repertoire of lived and experientially proven opportunities linked to a cosmologically fixed moral framework (chik) becomes a set of strategics to be exploited instrumentally depending on ad hoc assessments of the possibilities offered by ever-changing surroundings.
And, contrary to Nietzsche, they are not cosmologically intuited constellations of unfolding contradictory forces; they are what we perceive them to be:
Such cosmologically inspired designs have a long tradition in Iroquoian art.
Consequently, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is both structurally and temporally prior to all things; it is first both cosmogonically and cosmologically.
Whilst not being "environmentalists", indigenous peoples generally are conscious of their dependence on nature, not only physical but mainly, cosmologically.
This means that light from a cosmologically distant quasar will be deflected, or gravitationally lensed, by the intervening galaxy along the line of sight before arriving at an observer on the Earth," said Chen of the phenomenon of gravitational lensing, which was predicted by Einstein in 1936.
82) The North is cosmologically identified with the water element, which is, in turn, a yin element.
These two points of focus--sensoriality and reality--are somewhat circular cosmologically, both supporting each other: "if it really is there I can see it; if I can see it, it really is there.