containment

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con·tain·ment

 (kən-tān′mənt)
n.
1. The act or condition of containing.
2. A policy of checking the expansion or influence of a hostile power or ideology, as by the creation of strategic alliances or support of client states in areas of conflict or unrest.
3. A structure or system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive materials from a reactor.

containment

(kənˈteɪnmənt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the act or condition of containing, esp of restraining the ideological or political power of a hostile country or the operations of a hostile military force
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (from 1947 to the mid-1970s) a principle of US foreign policy that sought to prevent the expansion of Communist power
3. (Nuclear Physics) physics Also called: confinement the process of preventing the plasma in a controlled thermonuclear reactor from reaching the walls of the reaction vessel, usually by confining it within a configuration of magnetic fields. See magnetic bottle

con•tain•ment

(kənˈteɪn mənt)

n.
1. the act or condition of containing.
2. an act or policy of restricting the territorial growth or ideological influence of a hostile power, esp. a Communist power.
3. an enclosure surrounding a nuclear reactor designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material.
[1645–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.containment - a policy of creating strategic alliances in order to check the expansion of a hostile power or ideology or to force it to negotiate peacefully; "containment of communist expansion was a central principle of United States' foreign policy from 1947 to the 1975"
policy - a plan of action adopted by an individual or social group; "it was a policy of retribution"; "a politician keeps changing his policies"
2.containment - (physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor
system - instrumentality that combines interrelated interacting artifacts designed to work as a coherent entity; "he bought a new stereo system"; "the system consists of a motor and a small computer"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
3.containment - the act of containing; keeping something from spreading; "the containment of the AIDS epidemic"; "the containment of the rebellion"
restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
ring containment - a strategy of defense in cases of bioterrorism; vaccination only of people exposed and others who are in contact with them; "ring containment is a proven method of halting a smallpox epidemic"
Translations

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] N (Pol) → contención f

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] n
(POLITICS) (= policy) → endiguement m
(= control) [fire, disease] → maîtrise f

containment

n (Mil) → In-Schach-Halten nt; (of attack)Abwehr f; their efforts at containment (of the rebels)ihre Bemühungen, die Rebellen in Schach zu halten

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] ncontenimento
References in periodicals archive ?
The cost containment component is based on how effectively the practice manages non-physician costs.
The primary services consulting pharmacists provide to nursing homes fall under four categories: clinical consultation, education, regulation compliance, and cost containment, with cost containment gaining importance over the past few years.
This persistent focus on cost containment led ATPCO last year to review its approach to data protection for its distributed environment and evaluate whether there was a more cost-effective and resilient process to help improve data integrity and support near continuous operations.
The adoption of new managed care and medical cost containment initiatives in the workers' compensation system has slowed in recent years as the focus has shifted to evaluating programs now in place, according to the Workers' Compensation Research Institute.
in its latest research, Managed Care and Medical Cost Containment in Workers' Compensation: A National Inventory, 1999-2 001.
The volume synthesizes research on internal cost containment strategies across the institution from salaries to libraries to facilities and deferred maintenance.
The most effective managed disability programs have five key components: partnership among employer, employee, carrier, and health-care provider; prevention; integration of short- and long-term disability coverage under one carrier; cost containment, achieved through case management and by following duration guidelines; and management-information systems that track costs and measure success.
benefits, disability cost containment, preventing employee disabilities, job retention programs, return to work programs, and the team approach to disability management).
The complexity of this issue derives in part from the large array of cost containment activities available to health care institutions.
The focus of the bibliography, however, is on cost containment and efficiency, and it details models and best practices for cost containment.