cost-effectiveness


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cost-ef·fec·tive

(kôst′ĭ-fĕk′tĭv)
adj.
Economical in terms of the goods or services received for the money spent.

cost′-ef·fec′tive·ly adv.
cost′-ef·fec′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cost-effectiveness

[ˌkɒstɪˈfektɪvnɪs] Nrentabilidad f, relación f coste-rendimiento or (LAm) costo-rendimiento
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cost-effectiveness

[ˌkɒstɪˈfɛktɪvnɪs] nconvenienza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in Mexico.
Two of the three Colombian studies were cost-effectiveness analyses (total anesthesia versus inhaled anesthesia, and campaign versus routine infant immunization), and one was a cost-benefit analysis (vaccination versus no influenza vaccination) (7).
The objective of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of screening pregnant women for autoimmune thyroid disease.
It is particularly important to assess the cost-effectiveness of an intervention that is designed to be more intensive than the alternative; even if effectiveness is improved, costs are likely to be higher and therefore understanding what additional benefits are being gained for what cost is important.
The World Bank has applied the Allocation by Cost-effectiveness (ABC) model in Honduras, Panama and Guatemala.
Cost-effectiveness analyses in health; a practical approach, 2d ed.
This cost-effectiveness analysis, conducted from the viewpoint of a funding agency in the UK, evaluated the relative value of: 1) prenatal testing and prepartum antibiotics if the result is positive, 2) treatment of all women, except those with no risk factors, and 3) vaccination during pregnancy, which is not yet available.
The EPA has released two new documents examining the cost-effectiveness of diesel retrofits.
Cost-effectiveness analysis has won growing acceptance as a tool to help policymakers allocate health resources more effectively.
We estimated cost-effectiveness of annually vaccinating children not at high risk with inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) to range from US $12,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved for children ages 6-23 months to $119,000 per QALY saved for children ages 12-17 years.
Myriad Genetics announced that The Pharmacogenomics Journal published the results of the first cost-effectiveness analysis of the EndoPredict test compared to other breast cancer assays.
We use three primary types of cost analysis in healthcare: cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-utility analysis.