cost-push

cost-push

(kôst′po͝osh′)
n.
Inflation in which increased production costs, as from higher wages, tend to drive prices up.
References in periodicals archive ?
The possible hardening of inflation due to fiscal slippages and turn in commodity cycle, which may give cost-push pressure on prices, had a bearing on the RBI decision to keep the rate constant," said Soumya Kanti Ghosh, group chief economic adviser, SBI.
Similarly, the cost-push impact was conservatively imputed affecting mainly the sin taxes, oil products and a pass through for the rest.
This is expected to have a domino effect on the entire economy by inducing cost-push inflation.
However, of course, initially, you would have the cost-push effect of the higher indirect taxes,' said Medalla.
69% month-on-month (m-o-m) in April 2017, recording its third consecutive decline due to fading cost-push pressures after averaging 4.
The second, cost-push explanation of inflation suggests that advances in the economy's price level may result from cost pressures precipitated by sudden increases in the price of labor or other inputs.
The current level of inflation and future upside risks are largely explained by transitory cost-push factors, while demand-side factors continue to pose downside risks to the inflation outlook.
Erdoy-an certainly has in mind a cost-push inflation mechanism.
WHAT economic phenomenon may be cost-push or |demand-pull?
Which economic phenomenon may be described as either cost-push or demand-pull?
It describes China's current macroeconomic status, which is characterized by high savings, investment, and economic growth, and examines the components of its economy, including its aggregate supply and demand functions, external demand-driven economic fluctuations, structural and cost-push inflations, and structural economic changes.
IMF's recipe of increase in the rates of utilities produces 'the multiplier effect', leading to cost-push inflation making it impossible for the local producers to compete in the world market.