cotangent


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cotangent: cosecant, Inverse cotangent, secant
click for a larger image
cotangent
cot θ = b/a

co·tan·gent

 (kō-tăn′jənt, kō′tăn′-)
n. Abbr. cot
1. The reciprocal of the tangent of an angle in a right triangle.
2. The tangent of the complement of a directed angle or arc.

co′tan·gen′tial (-jĕn′shəl) adj.

cotangent

(kəʊˈtændʒənt)
n
(Mathematics) (of an angle) a trigonometric function that in a right-angled triangle is the ratio of the length of the adjacent side to that of the opposite side; the reciprocal of tangent. Abbreviation: cot, cotan or ctn
cotangential adj

co•tan•gent

(koʊˈtæn dʒənt, ˈkoʊˌtæn-)

n.
1. (in a right triangle) the ratio of the side adjacent to a given angle to the side opposite.
2. the tangent of the complement, or the reciprocal of the tangent, of a given angle or arc. Abbr.: cot, ctn
Also called co•tan (ˈkoʊˌtæn)
[1625–35; < New Latin cotangent-, s. of cotangēns]
co`tan•gen′tial (-ˈdʒɛn ʃəl) adj.

co·tan·gent

(kō-tăn′jənt)
The ratio of the length of the adjacent side of an acute angle in a right triangle to the length of the opposite side; the inverse of a tangent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cotangent - ratio of the adjacent to the opposite side of a right-angled triangle
circular function, trigonometric function - function of an angle expressed as a ratio of the length of the sides of right-angled triangle containing the angle
Translations
kotangens
kotangentti
cotangens
co-tangente
cotangent

cotangent

[kəʊˈtændʒənt] n (Math) → cotangente f
References in periodicals archive ?
Proposed method of Hurwitz-Radon Matrices (MHR) is applied in curve modeling via different coefficients: polynomial, sinusoidal, cosinusoidal, tangent, cotangent, logarithmic, exponential, arcsin, arccos, arctan, arcctg or power.
The scales provide the tangent or cotangent of the meridian altitude.
In the last equations [sigma] = ds is the scalar arc element for (P) and (P'); [lambda] is cotangent angle, i.
From 40[degrees] to 50[degrees], cotangent is a decreasing function.
Let ([zeta]) denote the functional equation for the zeta function and (S) the classical sampling theorem; furthermore, let (C) denote the expansion of the cotangent function in partial fractions, (F) a special Fourier series, and (v) the functional equation for Jacobi's theta function.
Following Martin and Matthiessen (1991), they are commonly represented in SFG by means of cotangent circles (see Figure 2).
15,: (i) where cotan [delta] is the cotangent of the loss angle of a sample of said polyisoprene, measured at 130[degrees]C.