cottager

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cot·tag·er

 (kŏt′ĭ-jər)
n.
One who resides in a cottage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cottager

(ˈkɒtɪdʒə)
n
1. a person who lives in a cottage
2. a rural labourer
3. chiefly Canadian a person holidaying in a cottage, esp an owner and seasonal resident of a cottage in a resort area
4. (Historical Terms) history another name for cotter2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cot•tag•er

(ˈkɒt ɪ dʒər)

n.
1. a person who lives in a cottage.
2. a person having a private house at a vacation resort.
[1540–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cottager - someone who lives in a cottage
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cottager

[ˈkɒtɪdʒəʳ] N (Brit) → aldeano/a m/f (US) → veraneante mf (en una casita de campo)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cottager

n (Brit) → Cottagebewohner(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The girl was young and of gentle demeanour, unlike what I have since found cottagers and farmhouse servants to be.
Often, when they had no more agreeable occupation at hand, the Misses Murray would amuse themselves with visiting the poor cottagers on their father's estate, to receive their flattering homage, or to hear the old stories or gossiping news of the garrulous old women; or, perhaps, to enjoy the purer pleasure of making the poor people happy with their cheering presence and their occasional gifts, so easily bestowed, so thankfully received.
There were only three hiding-places where he had ever heard of cottagers' hoards being found: the thatch, the bed, and a hole in the floor.
On her way to her work she passed two of the cottagers' children in the neighborhood at play in the park.
Upon these, and the like reasonings, their opinion is, that parents are the last of all others to be trusted with the education of their own children; and therefore they have in every town public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of both sexes to be reared and educated, when they come to the age of twenty moons, at which time they are supposed to have some rudiments of docility.
There are several families among the cottagers of this county of almost equal lustre.
The groups of cottagers in the park were gradually diminishing, the young ones being attracted towards the lights that were beginning to gleam from the windows of the gallery in the abbey, which was to be their dancing-room, and some of the sober elder ones thinking it time to go home quietly.
She had better do the old countrywoman: the Cottager's wife; you had, indeed, Julia.
A COTTAGER and his wife had a Hen that laid a golden egg every day.
You have not: A cottager, I mark'd a throne Of half the world as all my own, And murmur'd at such lowly lot - But, just like any other dream, Upon the vapour of the dew My own had past, did not the beam Of beauty which did while it thro' The minute - the hour - the day - oppress My mind with double loveliness.
There were besides, the cottager and his wife, and three young sturdy children, brown as berries.
The woman was very wholesome-looking, a likely woman, a cottager's wife, but she had very good clothes and linen, and everything well about her; and with a heavy heart and many a tear, I let her have my child.