cottontail

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cot·ton·tail

 (kŏt′n-tāl′)
n.
Any of several rabbits of the genus Sylvilagus of the Americas, having grayish or brownish fur and a small round tail often with a fluffy white underside.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cottontail

(ˈkɒtənˌteɪl)
n
(Animals) any of several common rabbits of the genus Sylvilagus, such as S. floridanus (eastern cottontail), of American woodlands
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cot•ton•tail

(ˈkɒt nˌteɪl)

n.
any North American rabbit of the genus Sylvilagus.
[1865–70, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cottontail - common small rabbit of North America having greyish or brownish fur and a tail with a white undersidecottontail - common small rabbit of North America having greyish or brownish fur and a tail with a white underside; a host for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
rabbit, cony, coney - any of various burrowing animals of the family Leporidae having long ears and short tails; some domesticated and raised for pets or food
genus Sylvilagus, Sylvilagus - North American rabbits
eastern cottontail, Sylvilagus floridanus - widely distributed in United States except northwest and far west regions
canecutter, swamp hare, Sylvilagus aquaticus, swamp rabbit - a wood rabbit of southeastern United States swamps and lowlands
marsh hare, swamp rabbit, Sylvilagus palustris - a wood rabbit of marshy coastal areas from North Carolina to Florida
hare, rabbit - flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cottontail

[ˈkɒtnteɪl] N (US) → conejo m (de cola blanca)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
It had to break a couple of big banking companies and squeeze half a dozen big fellows, too, and it did it by stampeding the cottontails. The cottontails did the rest all right, and the trust gathered in Chattanooga Coal and Iron.
They're a lot of little cottontail rabbits making believe they're big rip-snorting timber wolves.
But the other animals--the squirrels, and quail, and cottontails, were creatures of the Wild who had never yielded allegiance to man.
FLOPSY, Mopsy, and Cottontail, who were good little bunnies, went down the lane to gather blackberries;
A cottontail rabbit had scuttled across the road, and a tiny dust cloud lingered like smoke, marking the way of his flight.
I could tell the beagles were excited and ready to run some cottontails.
You'll likely make this recipe with store-bought rabbits or cottontails, but if you happen to be blessed with a young snowshoe hare or squirrel, use them.
There's a reason our grandparents, who were happy with any meat they could gather, called cottontails hedgerow chicken.
Lagomorphs such as eastern cottontails are herbivores that can affect vegetation composition due to preferential foraging (Crawley, 1990; Olofsson et al., 2008).
Additionally, automobile strikes may be a significant cause of cottontail mortality as cottontails are frequently observed dead on the roadways in central Georgia.
These predators will be feasting soon on the first cottontails of the year -- but they'll be hard-pressed to find New England cottontails in New England.
Two 11-week-old New England cottontails (Sylvilagus transitionalis) are scooped up by Cindy Maynard, a biologist with the U.S.