council-manager plan

Related to council-manager plan: commission plan

council-manager plan

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the US) a system of local government with an elected legislative council and an appointed administrative manager. See also city manager
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References in periodicals archive ?
Before El Paso, the largest city to adopt a council-manager plan since 1998 was Norwich, Connecticut (population, 36,000).
Norm King (December 10, 1997) says it best: "The primary issue is not the council-manager plan.
In the early days of the council-manager plan, most managers were civil engineers by training (Lineberry and Sharkansky 1974).
3) He argued that large cities were turning to the mayor-with-general-manager plan and away from the council-manager plan, for several reasons.
The model charter distinguished "legislation" from "administration," following the differentiation made by Goodnow, naturally assigning the former to the council and the latter to the manager, but the theoreticians and practitioners of die council-manager plan did not adhere to a fundamental dichotomy between policy and administration.
By the end of 1915, the council-manager plan had been adopted by eighty-two cities, with the number almost doubling by 1920.
The final blow came in 1996 when Dade County moved to a strong mayor system and abolished the council-manager plan.
It is interesting to note that "Richard Childs himself, however, acknowledged in the early 1970s that the council-manager plan may date back to 1904, when the Ukiah, California Board of Trustees appointed an 'Executive Officer' to serve at its pleasure.
In a recent review of the literature, James Svara found consistent evidence that, almost throughout the history of the council-manager plan, managers have played an active role in the policy process.
Adoption of the council-manager plan continues to outstrip adoption of the strong-mayor form.
At a macro-structural level, relatedly, the council-manager plan itself has not adapted.
Furthermore, to avoid the virulent opposition so frequently generated by efforts to promote the council-manager plan, [10] advocates of municipal reform have largely redirected their efforts over the past two decades toward promoting adoption of a hybrid system with an appointed general administrator or chief administrative officer and a weak, part-time mayor within the traditional mayor-alderman form.

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