count off


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Related to count off: count out, count against

count 1

 (kount)
v. count·ed, count·ing, counts
v.tr.
1.
a. To name or list (the units of a group or collection) one by one in order to determine a total; number.
b. To recite numerals in ascending order up to and including: count three before firing.
c. To include in a reckoning; take account of: ten dogs, counting the puppies.
2. Informal
a. To include by or as if by counting: Count me in.
b. To exclude by or as if by counting: Count me out.
3. To believe or consider to be; deem: Count yourself lucky.
v.intr.
1. To recite or list numbers in order or enumerate items by units or groups: counted by tens.
2.
a. To have importance: You really count with me.
b. To have a specified importance or value: Their opinions count for little. Each basket counts for two points.
3. Music To keep time by counting beats.
n.
1. The act of counting or calculating.
2.
a. A number reached by counting.
b. The totality of specific items in a particular sample: a white blood cell count.
3. Law Any of the separate and distinct charges or causes of action in an indictment or complaint.
4. Sports The counting from one to ten seconds, during which time a boxer who has been knocked down must rise or be declared the loser.
5. Baseball The number of balls and strikes that an umpire has called against a batter.
Phrasal Verbs:
count down
To recite numerals in descending order, as during a countdown.
count off
To recite numbers in turn, as when dividing people or things into groups : The 24 children counted off by twos, forming a dozen pairs.
count on
1. To rely on; depend on: You can count on my help.
2. To be confident of; anticipate: counted on getting a raise.
count out
To declare (a boxer) to have been knocked out by calling out the count.
Idiom:
count heads/noses
To make a count of members, attendees, or participants.

[Middle English counten, from Old French conter, from Latin computāre, to calculate : com-, com- + putāre, to think; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

count 2

 (kount)
n.
1. A nobleman in some European countries.
2. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

[Middle English counte, from Old French conte, from Late Latin comes, comit-, occupant of any state office, from Latin, companion; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.count off - call in turn from right to left or from back to front numbers that determine some position or function
call out - call out loudly, as of names or numbers
Translations

w>count off

vt sep
viabzählen
References in classic literature ?
She let the lonely clock on the landing count off fifteen ticks into the abyss of eternity, and asked:
They may not all have bar mitzvahs, but if you count off the usual tenets of a werewolf storyfollowing a lunar calendar, dashing off when the sun goes down, making excuses for weird disappearances, accusations, hunts, being driven off by suspicious townspeopleit's easy to guess why Jewish creators throughout the years have chosen the werewolf as a central horror figure.
He impressed with his prodigious tackle count off the bench in last Saturday's 17-15 victory out in Galway and now steps up to wear No 7.
After laying out some of the areas that need to be addressed, Arango proceeded to count off and split the room into five groups for a mapping exercise.
Players should stand around in a circle and count off in order.
The meeting reviewed a range of replies from ministers on a number of questions submitted to them by the members of Majlis AShura, including the reply from the Minister of Manpower on vocational rehabilitation for people with special needs, the reply from the Minister of Social Development about the mechanism to count off people with special needs in the Sultanate, and the reply from the Minister of Education about the Quranic schools and her reply on the mechanism of marking the general diploma examinations .