counterfeiter


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coun·ter·feit

 (koun′tər-fĭt′)
v. coun·ter·feit·ed, coun·ter·feit·ing, coun·ter·feits
v.tr.
1. To make an imitation or copy of (something), usually with the intent to defraud: counterfeits money.
2. To make a pretense of; feign: counterfeited interest in the story.
v.intr.
1. To carry on a deception; dissemble.
2. To make fraudulent copies of something valuable.
adj.
1. Made in imitation of what is genuine with the intent to defraud: a counterfeit dollar bill.
2. Simulated; feigned: "'You don't understand,' Morrison said with counterfeit patience" (Stephen King).
n.
A fraudulent imitation or facsimile.

[Middle English countrefeten, from contrefet, made in imitation, from Old French contrefait, past participle of contrefaire, to counterfeit : contre-, counter- + faire, to make (from Latin facere; see dhē- in Indo-European roots).]

coun′ter·feit′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.counterfeiter - someone who makes copies illegally
coiner - a maker of counterfeit coins
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
paperhanger - someone who passes bad checks or counterfeit paper money

counterfeiter

noun
One who makes a fraudulent copy of something:
Translations

counterfeiter

[ˈkaʊntərfɪtər] n [document, goods] → faussaire mf; [money] → faux-monnayeur m

counterfeiter

[ˈkaʊntəˌfɪtəʳ] ncontraffattore/trice
References in classic literature ?
He was caught between fire and water; he made a superhuman effort, the effort of a counterfeiter of money who is on the point of being boiled, and who seeks to escape.
I cannot think they will help to refine the ragamuffins if they read them, and I'm sure they can do no good to the better class of boys, who through these books are introduced to police courts, counterfeiters' dens, gambling houses, drinking saloons, and all sorts of low life."
This jail was a Noah's ark of the city's crime--there were murderers, "hold-up men" and burglars, embezzlers, counterfeiters and forgers, bigamists, "shoplifters," "confidence men," petty thieves and pickpockets, gamblers and procurers, brawlers, beggars, tramps and drunkards; they were black and white, old and young, Americans and natives of every nation under the sun.
“There's the counterfeiters,” returned the magistrate, “as they were caught in the act, I think it likely that they’ll be indicted, in which case it’s probable they’ll be tried.”
Despite the numerous arrests of the counterfeiters and their cohorts in the area, the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) still directed the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) to carry on with its relentless efforts until the last Recto counterfeiter is put behind bars.
The design of the hologram is critical as the counterfeiter can replace it with another hologram that looks similar.'
The suspect subsequently told authorities who supplied him with the forged banknotes, prompting police to raid the alleged counterfeiter's house.
The bottom line, Bruna says, is this: If one product has a seal and one doesn't, which product will a counterfeiter choose to copy?
There is, however, one case where his defense is more than a little controversial: that of the private counterfeiter. According to Block, an individual counterfeiter who creates his own notes commits no real crime because money issued by the government is itself counterfeit, and counterfeiting counterfeit money is analogous to seizing stolen goods from thieves.
Since technology has empowered the counterfeiter with low cost but high quality imaging, printing and distribution capabilities, technology must also provide consumers, brand owners, manufacturers, and law enforcement officials with the tools needed to fight the threat of counterfeiters.
From original research on counterfeit traders in emerging markets (especially India and Nigeria),15 the median total cost of production for the counterfeiter is about 5% of the final sales price (varying between 1% to 30% depending on which product is faked and which country it is sold in; 1% for faking innovator ciprofloxacin in a city like Sao Paolo where it can sell for $100 a treatment, to 30% for faking very cheap chloroquine selling for one dollar in Delhi).
Tarnoff's second counterfeiter is David Lewis, a handsome, swashbuckler sort who became a folk hero on the basis of his audacious escapades passing bad money and then breaking out of jail.