countermyth

countermyth

(ˈkaʊntəˌmɪθ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a myth that conflicts with another myth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
What he dramatizes in the novel is "the struggle between the benign national myth of itself that a great power prefers to perpetuate, and the relentlessly insidious, very nearly demonic reality (like the kind we had known in the sixties) that will not give an inch in behalf of that idealized mythology." Regarding American Pastoral, this struggle between myth and countermyth is commonly examined in the relation between the Swede and Merry.
At the same time, all the works in the chapter evince an awareness of the mutability of historical narrative: even the nationalistic Fordun doesn't hesitate to point to contradictory accounts of his Trojan matter, both in terms of the Gaythelos story's status as a countermyth to that of Geoffrey's Brutus, and in terms of contradictory information within his own account of Gaythelos.
Jenks takes the Gagarin myth, inverts it, and presents the resulting countermyth as true, when the highly curated state of the evidence, as Jenks describes it, most probably renders the content of Gagarins character an unsolvable mystery.
Declaring one version of history true, from this perspective, is a strategic ploy to create a subversive countermyth about the past.
At one level, then, Ghost Milk is a "catalogue of loss." It is also an extended act of countermyth. Unmoved by the official legacy-and-pride version of the Olympics, Sinclair travels to Berlin to visit the site of the 1936 games, finding "rings ...
No obstante, destaca que, con la aplicacion de las teorias posmodernas a la traduccion, se desenmascararon algunos mitos como la presunta neutralidad del lenguaje juridico, por lo cual esta tecnica, aplicada con profesionalidad y de forma razonable, puede ser aceptable y funcionar como "a useful antidote or 'countermyth'" (ib.: 6).
These visions use the literary means of fantasy to articulate what might be called a countermyth to the mythology of divine envy and devouring love apparent in the culture that sacrifices Psyche and hidden but equally powerful in the more enlightened, pre-conversion mind of Orual.
As Marvin D'Lugo remarks, "the corpulent Coral has been nurtured on a countermyth: the exotic fictions of harlequin novels, radio dramas, popular love ballads, and the Hollywood star system, emblematically embodied by the framed photograph of Charles Boyer over her dressing-table mirror" (36).
According to Foster, "the prevailing myth of the late twentieth century is one of social, economic and political progress," yet most memoirs expose "a countermyth of private shame and disgrace,...
She also created a masculine countermyth in contrast to the Three Sisters motif: the erratic, tyrannical father shooting pistols out the door in rages and the spoiled sot brother being seduced by his employer's wife (the mother of the children he tutored).
The central story in the Little Black Book is a countermyth to the story of Pygmalion, whose perfect statue was brought to life by Venus, and to Hermione's transformation from stone to living woman at the end of Shakespeare's play.
It offers the view that modernization, seen as a way to go beyond atavistic nationalism and its myths is itself a countermyth which ends, disappointingly, in such embourgeoisement and participates in the dismantling of the aestheticism and the pluralism it professes to espouse.