counterquestion

counterquestion

(ˈkaʊntəˌkwɛstʃən)
n
a question which acts as a reply to another question
vb (tr)
to reply to a question of (a person) with another question
References in periodicals archive ?
His response to questions about what he thinks becomes a non-directive counterquestion, 'What do you think?' His job becomes one of weaning the group away from any dependency upon him.
It is aimed less at creating a particular context than at involving the passing viewer in the self-reflexive reconstruction of a counterquestion. Similarly, One, Two, Three, ..., 2005/2010, a work based on three prints of a photograph of the drummer in the German band Tocotronic, appeals to the beholder's experience more than to the concert as an event, the person depicted, or the social context of this influential rock group.
The Englishman fires back the devastating counterquestion, "And where does that turtle stand?" "Ah, Sahib, after that it is turtles all the way down!" (64)
The lectionary text editors could have made it easier for preaching the kingdom on this one if they had added Jesus' counterquestion in the very next verses that Mark gives us ("David calls him Lord; so how can he be his son?").
And, although the author makes a good case for the importance of kinship, one might respond with a counterquestion: Was it really the establishment of kinship networks that allowed Comanches access to the plains where they coincidentally acquired horses or did Comanches go onto the plains to get horses and then coincidentally establish kinship networks that thereby strengthened their hold on the territory?
11) tumbled headlong into the fallacy of the counterquestion. Weigel asserts that the current clergy scandal is the "greatest crisis in church history" and names "Catholic Lite" as the cause.
Revelation!' The counterquestion would be, how does Marxism arise in the context of the bourgeoisie?
DELANY: The answer requires a counterquestion: What's the purpose of an interview in the first place?
Their answer to his counterquestion would have answered their own question.
Yet it is strange, because as John Donahue observes, "Luke subtly alters the thrust of the parable." Jesus does not so much answer the lawyer's question as "describe what it means to be a neighbor, which then becomes the substance of [his] counterquestion in Luke 10: 36, `Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?'"(79) The lawyer's response, "the Samaritan," is marked with irony, since it is the despised schismatic of Samaria who reveals the meaning of the law to the lawyer.(80) And Jesus, with no less irony, then bids him, "Go, and do likewise."
When he poses a counterquestion about authority which they will not answer, Jesus declines to answer them.