counterreform

counterreform

(ˈkaʊntərɪˌfɔːm)
n
a reform which opposes or acts against another reform
adj
opposed to reform
vb (tr)
to reform (something) in opposition to another reform
References in periodicals archive ?
In Soviet historiography there were two trends in the interpretation of government policy toward the reformed court system: one viewed the judicial "counterreform" in the Russian Empire as complete and held that by the end of the 19th century democratic ideals of justice and judicial proceedings had been rejected; those who disagreed with this view included B.
"The World Is the Orphan's Home: Marianne Moore on God and Family." In Reform and Counterreform: Dialectics of the Word in Western Christianity since Luther, edited by John C.
Marlowe, like many of his contemporaries who had to negotiate the violent cross-currents of reform and counterreform, used the art of writing and its theatrical expression to tread this line carefully, even as he exposed the hypocrisies that kept it in place" (312).
The first time was, of course, when Flanders became the main ideological and military showroom of a counterreform fostered by Spain.
Nor do I want to suggest that there are easy lessons to be drawn from the path of reform and counterreform in the reorganization process.
Behind the scenes, the original initiative to amend Article 24 was actually a serious counterreform effort orchestrated by the Catholic hierarchy, long promoted by the VAN and submitted and supported by some members of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).
[For further analysis on the development of the democratic reform movement in Thailand and its subsequent regression thanks to the rise of counterreform tendencies, see: Kasian Tejapira, 'Reform and Counter-Reform: Democratization and its Discontents in post-May 1992 Thai politics'.
unresolved land claims when Mexico's agrarian counterreform began
He laments the fact that advocates fought over many decades to establish a robust system of universal social insurance for unemployment in Canada, only to have this achievement undermined by a narrowing of the scope of unemployment protection in the last couple of decades, in what he variously describes as a "counterreform ideology" (137), a "backlash" (91), a form of "revenge" (ibid.), and even a "hijacked" system (147).