counterspy

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coun·ter·spy

 (koun′tər-spī′)
n. pl. coun·ter·spies
A spy working in opposition to enemy espionage.

counterspy

(ˈkaʊntəˌspaɪ)
n, pl -spies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a spy working against or investigating enemy espionage

coun•ter•spy

(ˈkaʊn tərˌspaɪ)

n., pl. -spies.
a spy active in counterespionage.
[1935–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.counterspy - a spy who works against enemy espionagecounterspy - a spy who works against enemy espionage
spy, undercover agent - (military) a secret agent hired by a state to obtain information about its enemies or by a business to obtain industrial secrets from competitors
References in periodicals archive ?
But Mr Putin said in an interview with the Financial Times: "Listen, all this fuss about spies and counterspies, it is not worth serious interstate relations.
however, Mr Putin said in an interview with the Financial Times: "Listen, all this fuss about spies and counterspies, it is not worth serious interstate relations."
He said: "This fuss about spies and counterspies, it is not worth serious interstate relations."
He said: "This fuss about spies and counterspies, it is not worth serious interstate relations." No10 said the PM read Putin's interview before the talks.
Michal is only the second person I met on this trip who was born before 1989 in this side of Europe that, in those Cold War years following World War II, was portrayed in the John Wayne movies, the James Bond series, and the Indiana Jones trilogy as the evil empire of spies, counterspies, evil doctors, assasins, and godless, heartless Stalinists.
"Intelligence," he advises, "must always be relevant to real political and military purposes and must be accurate, precise and verifiable." Of spies and counterspies, history reveals that "[i]t is far from easy to spot a wolf in sheep's clothing." Rescher cites as examples the cases involving Alger Hiss, Claus Fuchs, and Anthony Blunt.
Salt entered the world of motion pictures at the height of film noir filmmaking during an era filled with fear of the atomic bomb, the Soviet Union, the Korean War, and spies and counterspies, a period when tough-guy anti-heroes stalked the silver screen in search of red saboteurs intent on destroying the American Way.
(130.) In 2005, it was reported that "someone with inside access" to the cellphone company, Vodafone, had "been bugging more than 100 high-ranking government officials and dignitaries including the prime minister of Greece, his wife, and the Mayor of Athens." John Markoff, Engineers as Counterspies: How the Greek Cellphone System Was Bugged N.Y.
The North Building is a worthy follow-up, a taut thriller in which a cynical and scarred journalist is reluctantly drawn back into the deadly world of spies and counterspies.
And we would agree that in a novel about spies and counterspies it is befitting that the Narrator should behave like a spy on behalf of the reader, as he reads and comments on the pages of the diaries.