counterstep

counterstep

(ˈkaʊntəˌstɛp)
n
an opposing step or measure
References in periodicals archive ?
The counterstep at each blind spot prevents eye and mind from anticipating what's next; there's a continuous absence of a sense of where you are, where you've been, and where you're going.
i] of a transaction, except the last, the application developer specifies a counterstep [c.
Researchers have variously introduced the notions of transaction steps, countersteps, allowed versus prohibited interleavings of steps, and implementations in locking environments.
1984) ("Although respondents did not raise this issue [duty to obey] in the courts below, a new argument may be raised for the first time in the Court of Appeals if it could not have been obviated or cured by factual showings or legal countersteps in the court of first instance.
1969)) ("[W]e lack jurisdiction to review unpreserved issues in the interest of justice [but could consider an unpreserved issue] if it could not have been avoided by factual showings or legal countersteps had it been raised below.
48) It noted a rule for new issues: "A new issue--even a pure law issue--may be reached on appeal only if it could not have been avoided by factual showings or legal countersteps had it been raised below.
which could not have been obviated [or cured] by factual showings or legal countersteps if it had been raised below.