counterstream

counterstream

(ˈkaʊntəˌstriːm)
n
a stream (of matter) which travels in the opposite direction
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
We use the term counterstream, coined by Juan Flores, to refer to a set of cultural practices tied to the knowledge, experiences, and attitudes that Puerto Ricans who have lived abroad have introduced upon their return to the island.
AMC's Counterstream Radio and the Online Library are being folded into NewMusicBox to make a single, mega-information media site, and MTC's Meet The Composer Studio will continue to develop, illuminating the life and work of composers in new ways.
American Music Center http://www.amc.net/; Counterstream Radio http://counterstreamradio.org/; Newmusicbox http://www.newmusicbox.org/ (Accessed June-September 2008) [Requires a Web browser and an Internet connection; Counterstream Radio requires Adobe Flash player; other features may require Apple Quicktime or an alternate media player, and Adobe Acrobat Reader].
Since Ravenstein's (1889) recognition of 'counterstream' migration, the analysis of return and onwards migration has tended to be a relatively focused niche of the migration literature (Newbold and Bell 2001).
(3) In the migration literature, this tendency is sometimes referred to as the "counterstream" effect (Hoover and Giarratani).
People did stay in southeastern Kentucky, of course, and some were part of the small counterstream back to the area.
In The Diaspora Strikes Back, author Juan Flores focused on "cultural remittances" by the "counterstream," "...
En primer lugar, pretende analizar el peso a nivel artistico de lo que Juan Flores (2009) ha llamado el Counterstream en un momento en que se hace cada vez mas frecuente el estar "alla y aca", la consciencia de varios contextos a un mismo tiempo.
Reformulating Ravenstein with a focus on internal migration, Lee (1966) proposes what is currently termed the "push-pull" model of migration in regard to volume of migration, the development of streams and counterstreams, and the characteristics of immigrants.
One further, ambitious speculation concerns the neural machinery that might support such reliving: Ullman (1996) describes counterstreams, a pair of complementary, interconnected pathways traveling in opposite directions between the high-level and low-level visual areas.