countersubject


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countersubject

(ˈkaʊntəˌsʌbdʒɪkt)
n
(Classical Music) music (in a fugue) the theme in one voice that accompanies the statement of the subject in another
Translations
controsoggetto
References in periodicals archive ?
This segues into a fugal four-part chorus in F major with a lengthy subject and consistent countersubject forming a clearly conceived exposition; the rest of the movement maintains a strong polyphonic thread, but the strictness of the exposition gradually dissipates.
The countersubject bears a remarkable reciprocal relationship to the subject, unlike other fugues.
The subject and the countersubject lead to yet another idea which constitutes the answer--the mother feeding or "poisoning" the dog on girt [A] {mother--feed--dog}.
In these moments, the narrators' voices take on the role of countersubject, defined as 'a recurring counterpoint to the theme, often (but not always) adding its own motives.
Taking his structural cue from a Bach fugue, with its central melody joined by multiple voices in countersubject, Moses spins an elaborate web of plots and deceptions, blackmailing, kidnapping, bribery and forged letters, illicit pacts and betrayals.
Albrecht for Barenreiter thinks not, though, lest the reader imagines that I am about to side with Albrecht, it should be noted that Beckmann leaves unaltered the quirky rhythm of the countersubject in the first imitative section of the Praeludium in C major, BuxWV136, which Albrecht removes; it is hard to believe that such a distinctive feature could be an error of transcription.
The fugal writing is simple and easy to follow, and new entrances of the subject and countersubject are constructed in ways that make the needed entrance pitch easy to find among the other voices.
There are no countersubjects in the Fugue, and each voice states different material to accompany the subject statements in the exposition.
The fugal writing of the second aria treats subjects and countersubjects in a variety of styles: free, sequential, chromatic, canonic, stretto, and cadenza.
Scheidemann's frequent use of imitation at the inversion, and of regular countersubjects, reveals a concern with the types of counterpoint described in the treatises.
By examining these sketches, Caplin demonstrates that for Beethoven, the subject of the fugue was set in time, and that the compositional process revolved around the development of successful countersubjects.
Subjects are pink, countersubjects are blue, free counterpoint is green, and episodes are yellow.