countertrend

countertrend

(ˈkaʊntəˌtrɛnd)
n
a trend which is contrary to the established or perceived trend
References in periodicals archive ?
trade deficit is likely to widen further, after a surprising countertrend in March.
At the same time, the book is also not an artifact of the currently voguish countertrend of digital pessimism that I find to be similarly limiting and partial.
Maybe it's the start of a countertrend, in a world where so many indicators of freedom and good governance have been pointing downward.
In response to the busy society, ZEN ZON ZEE facilitates a countertrend. Help people to look for a healthy lifestyle; relaxation, awareness, slowness, welfare, attention and healthy food and drinks.
At the same time, a countertrend grew with the revival of nationalism, exemplified a decade later in the ritual suicide of internationally acclaimed author Mishima Yukio, in protest against the suppression of Japan's martial tradition.
Congress, however, which did so much to initiate the trend of unpaid internships, has been slow to pick up on the countertrend. This is largely because of its general resistance to hiring and paying staff adequately--that is, to undoing the damage the Gingrich revolution did three decades ago.
But the Marathon data revealed a disturbing countertrend: a significant decline in the length of the 10 largest muskies entered every year, a decline from 52.8 inches in 1964 to 48.4 inches in 2010.
The results, rather, show a small-scale countertrend, and only under certain conditions.
It should be noted that the distinctive trait of the absolute importance of personal commitment was a countertrend, even in the years of youth protest.
There's also a quiet countertrend that could impact produce sales at some supermarkets: home gardening.
With this W campaign, I wanted to send a strong countertrend message.