counterweight


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coun·ter·weight

 (koun′tər-wāt′)
n.
1. A weight used as a counterbalance.
2. A force or influence equally counteracting another.

coun′ter·weight′ed (-wā′tĭd) adj.

counterweight

(ˈkaʊntəˌweɪt)
n
a counterbalancing weight, influence, or force
ˈcounterˌweighted adj

coun•ter•weight

(ˈkaʊn tərˌweɪt)

n.
1. a weight used as a counterbalance.
v.t.
2. to balance or equip with a counterweight.
[1685–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.counterweight - a weight that balances another weight
sash weight - a counterweight for a sliding sash
tare - (chemical analysis) a counterweight used in chemical analysis; consists of an empty container that counterbalances the weight of the container holding chemicals
weight - an artifact that is heavy
Verb1.counterweight - constitute a counterweight or counterbalance to
counterbalance, oppose - contrast with equal weight or force
Translations

counterweight

[ˈkaʊntəweɪt]
A. N (lit, fig) → contrapeso m
B. VT (lit) → contrabalancear (fig) → contrarrestar, contrabalancear

counterweight

[ˈkaʊntərweɪt]
n (= counterbalance) → contrepoids m
a counterweight to sth → un contrepoids à qch
vt (= counter) [+ action, proposal] → contrebalancer
References in classic literature ?
There has been a violent stress in one direction, and it needs a counterweight."
Here, were the Leith, Aberdeen, and Glasgow steamers, loading and unloading goods, and looking immensely high out of the water as we passed alongside; here, were colliers by the score and score, with the coal-whippers plunging off stages on deck, as counterweights to measures of coal swinging up, which were then rattled over the side into barges; here, at her moorings was to-morrow's steamer for Rotterdam, of which we took good notice; and here to-morrow's for Hamburg, under whose bowsprit we crossed.
without examination, to deny what has been said, I wish it to be considered that the motion which I have now explained follows as necessarily from the very arrangement of the parts, which may be observed in the heart by the eye alone, and from the heat which may be felt with the fingers, and from the nature of the blood as learned from experience, as does the motion of a clock from the power, the situation, and shape of its counterweights and wheels.
Government provided both restraint and counterweight, the limits of technology slowed the pace of change, and national boundaries served to ground enterprise somewhat in particular communities and locales.
The company's engineers created a special mold to allow the cores of the counterweights to move inward.
To launch the rock, medieval soldiers cranked a windlass connected to a system of pulleys and ropes, hoisting the counterweight into the air.
It features active, speed-dependent rear axle steering and the ability to carry up to 25,300 pounds of counterweight, along with the swing away jib.
Spring counterweight systems aren't new--we've featured several articles in this magazine describing them.
While both theaters have what can be called modern counterweight rigging systems, many of the technologies of Cincinnati have been relegated to history, while Detroit's technologies and methods have endured.
A capable automated rigging system costs several times that of manual counterweight. Manual rigging is relatively inexpensive, and experienced users are far more common.
The stackers feature a unique rear counterweight that counter balances the tracks and wheels, which are behind the stacker's center of gravity.
Lumped-mass dynamic of the basic one-cylinder slider-crank mechanism, one counterweight, and crankshaft of a three-cylinder engine are shown in Figure 1.