counting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

count 1

 (kount)
v. count·ed, count·ing, counts
v.tr.
1.
a. To name or list (the units of a group or collection) one by one in order to determine a total; number.
b. To recite numerals in ascending order up to and including: count three before firing.
c. To include in a reckoning; take account of: ten dogs, counting the puppies.
2. Informal
a. To include by or as if by counting: Count me in.
b. To exclude by or as if by counting: Count me out.
3. To believe or consider to be; deem: Count yourself lucky.
v.intr.
1. To recite or list numbers in order or enumerate items by units or groups: counted by tens.
2.
a. To have importance: You really count with me.
b. To have a specified importance or value: Their opinions count for little. Each basket counts for two points.
3. Music To keep time by counting beats.
n.
1. The act of counting or calculating.
2.
a. A number reached by counting.
b. The totality of specific items in a particular sample: a white blood cell count.
3. Law Any of the separate and distinct charges or causes of action in an indictment or complaint.
4. Sports The counting from one to ten seconds, during which time a boxer who has been knocked down must rise or be declared the loser.
5. Baseball The number of balls and strikes that an umpire has called against a batter.
Phrasal Verbs:
count down
To recite numerals in descending order, as during a countdown.
count off
To recite numbers in turn, as when dividing people or things into groups : The 24 children counted off by twos, forming a dozen pairs.
count on
1. To rely on; depend on: You can count on my help.
2. To be confident of; anticipate: counted on getting a raise.
count out
To declare (a boxer) to have been knocked out by calling out the count.
Idiom:
count heads/noses
To make a count of members, attendees, or participants.

[Middle English counten, from Old French conter, from Latin computāre, to calculate : com-, com- + putāre, to think; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

count 2

 (kount)
n.
1. A nobleman in some European countries.
2. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

[Middle English counte, from Old French conte, from Late Latin comes, comit-, occupant of any state office, from Latin, companion; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

counting

(ˈkaʊntɪŋ)
n
1. the saying of numbers
2. totalling up; adding
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.counting - the act of countingcounting - the act of counting; reciting numbers in ascending order; "the counting continued for several hours"
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
blood count - the act of estimating the number of red and white corpuscles in a blood sample
census, nose count, nosecount - a periodic count of the population
countdown - counting backward from an arbitrary number to indicate the time remaining before some event (such as launching a space vehicle)
miscount - an inaccurate count
poll - the counting of votes (as in an election)
recount - an additional (usually a second) count; especially of the votes in a close election
sperm count - the act of estimating the number of spermatozoa in an ejaculate

counting

noun
Related words
like arithmomania
Translations

counting

[ˈkaʊntɪŋ] Ncálculo m
References in periodicals archive ?
The villagers hoped that counting would prevent them from getting cheated when trading Brazil nuts and other goods for products such as tobacco and whiskey ferried through the area by Portuguese riverboat owners.
In a newly published second edition, ADA Complete Guide To Carb Counting, these two experts update information on carb counting, provide the very latest insights on how to practice carb counting more effectively, explain how to count using both food labels and restaurant menus, and teach the reader just how to figure out strategies for eating ranging from meal plans to challenges away from home.
When the right arm recovers, both hands will be holding the kickboard and the swimmer kicks, while counting 4-5-6.
Counting is usually described in the literature as a complex activity requiring (1) the saying of number-words in the correct order and (2) the visual or manual pointing at each and every object (Beckwith & Restle, 1966; Potter & Levy, 1968).
Many people are counting on HAVA to go a long way toward improving an electoral system that needs repair.
In setting up the conditions for quantitative wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analysis a number of parameters have to be defined for each element, namely accelerating voltage, beam current, and (for each element) x-ray line, spectrometer crystal, pulse-height analyser settings, background offsets, and counting times for peak and background.
And while most suppliers agree that the number of threads per square inch by itself does not guarantee sheets are of superior quality, they have not stopped counting.
It's this sort of reasoning that led the Florida Supremes to conclude that the resolution of a contest requires only the statewide manual counting of contested "undervotes" rather than of all the votes (as the Bush team argued).
Not counting Florida, Gore had won 260 electoral votes and Bush, 246.
If this initial counting process is combined with appropriate statistical sampling techniques (expanded for tolerance-level violations) and acceptable internal controls, statistical sampling may be an acceptable substitute for a physical inventory when combined with perpetual counts.
Gillette uses the Panorama system for parts counting, but the job is performed more accurately with the aid of a link to the automation system.