courageous

(redirected from couragious)

cou·ra·geous

 (kə-rā′jəs)
adj.
Having or characterized by courage; valiant. See Synonyms at brave.

cou·ra′geous·ly adv.
cou·ra′geous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

courageous

(kəˈreɪdʒəs)
adj
possessing or expressing courage
couˈrageously adv
couˈrageousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cou•ra•geous

(kəˈreɪ dʒəs)

adj.
possessing or characterized by courage; brave.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French]
cou•ra′geous•ly, adv.
cou•ra′geous•ness, n.
syn: See brave.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.courageous - possessing or displaying couragecourageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"
adventuresome, adventurous - willing to undertake or seeking out new and daring enterprises; "adventurous pioneers"; "the risks and gains of an adventuresome economy"
fearless, unafraid - oblivious of dangers or perils or calmly resolute in facing them
bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"
resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

courageous

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

courageous

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
odvážný
modig
rohkea
hrabar
hugrakkur
勇気のある
용감한
pogumen
modig
กล้าหาญ
can đảm

courageous

[kəˈreɪdʒəs] ADJvaliente, valeroso
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

courageous

[kəˈreɪdʒəs] adj [person, action] → courageux/euse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

courageous

adjmutig; (= with courage of convictions)couragiert
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

courageous

[kəˈreɪdʒəs] adjcoraggioso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

courage

(ˈkaridʒ) , ((American) ˈkə:-) noun
the quality that makes a person able to meet dangers without fear; bravery. It took courage to sail the Atlantic singlehanded.
courageous (kəˈreidʒəs) adjective
having courage. a courageous soldier.
couˈrageously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

courageous

مِقْدام odvážný modig mutig θαρραλέος valeroso rohkea courageux hrabar coraggioso 勇気のある 용감한 moedig modig odważny corajoso отважный modig กล้าหาญ yürekli can đảm 有胆量的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

courageous

a. valiente, valeroso-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
And the two couragious soldiers Shaheed Abdul Rab and Shaheed Khurram, who sacrificed their lives on the Line of Control.'
Paradigmatic examples of thick concepts include COURAGIOUS, CRUEL, BRUTAL, CALLOUS, KIND, HONEST, LEWD and OPPRESSIVE.
They were hopeful of bright future and advised new generation must be committed, devoted, hard working, couragious, bold and energetic for high place of mother land in the global world.
As a sign of the Elizabethan fascination with the Orient, many great Elizabethan plays carry the titles of Turkish names and are set in Constantinople such as Kyd's Soliman and Perseda (1588), George Peele's Turkish Mahomet (1595), an unknown author's The Tragical Reign of Selimus (1594), Thomas Goffe's The Couragious Turk, or Amurath the First (1631), Lodowick Carlell's The Famous Tragedy of Osmond the Great Turk (1637), Thomas Mason's The Turk (1610) The Courageous Amurath I (1632), Fulke Greville's Mustapha (1606), and Alaham (written c.
Jan, passed away peacefully on 3rd April 2011 after a long and couragious struggle with cancer.
plays like Thomas Goffe's The Raging Turke (1613-1618?) and The Couragious Turke (1618), probably based directly on Knolles [Richard Knolles's The Generall Historie of the Turkes (1603)], reflect closely the ideological investments of the latter's chronicle history.
The Courageous Turk was first published posthumously in 1632 as The couragious Turke, or, Amurath the First.
The title page promises, at the bottom, "an Astrological Discourse touching the growing Greatness of that Excellent, Temperate, and Fruitfull Island: grounded upon its Nativity, or the first Moment of Time, wherein the Valiant English became Masters thereof." Gadbury claims that Jamaica is born--it has its "nativity"--at "the precise time in which our Valiant and Couragious Countreymen took possession of the Standard-Royal from the then Inhabitants....
Malebranch' who stated that women 'are Learned, Couragious, and capable of every thing' (12) is not explained (an unusual oversight given that Ezell's notes on contemporary figures to whom Chudleigh refers are usually very thorough).
The couragious free forward snatched the winning goal in the dying minutes of a thrilling Cammanachd Cup final at the Bught Park in Inverness.
Anne grew into a woman of "fierce and couragious temper." Once, "when a young Fellow would have lain with her against her Will, she beat him so, that he lay ill of it a considerable time." Ever the rebel, Anne soon forsook her father and his wealth to marry "a young Fellow, who belong'd to the Sea, and was not worth a Groat." She ran away with him to the Caribbean, where she dressed "in Men's Cloaths" and joined a band of pirates that included Mary Read and, more important, Calico Jack Rackam, who soon became the object of Anne's affections.
The movement there emerged in 1963 through the couragious efforts of a black dentist, Robert B.