courses


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course

 (kôrs)
n.
1.
a. Development in a particular way; progress: the course of events.
b. Movement in time; duration: in the course of a year.
2.
a. The direction of continuing movement: The boat took a northern course.
b. The route or path taken by something that moves, such as a stream or vehicle.
3. Sports
a. A designated route or area on which a race is held: the course of a marathon.
4. A mode of action or behavior: followed the best course and invested her money.
5. A typical, natural, or customary manner of proceeding or developing: a fad that ran its course.
6. A systematic or orderly succession; a sequence: a course of medical treatments.
7. A continuous layer of building material, such as brick or tile, on a wall or roof of a building.
8.
a. A complete body of prescribed studies constituting a curriculum: a four-year course in engineering.
b. A unit of such a curriculum: took an introductory course in chemistry; passed her calculus course.
9. A part of a meal served as a unit at one time: The first course was a delicious soup.
10. Nautical The lowest sail on a mast of a square-rigged ship.
11. A point on the compass, especially the one toward which a vehicle, such as a ship, is moving.
12. Music A string or set of two or more closely-spaced and usually identically-tuned strings, as on a lute.
v. coursed, cours·ing, cours·es
v.tr.
1. To move swiftly through or over; traverse: ships coursing the seas.
2.
a. To hunt (game) with hounds.
b. To set (hounds) to chase game.
v.intr.
1. To proceed or move swiftly in a certain direction or along a course: "Big tears now coursed down her face" (Iris Murdoch).
2. To hunt game with hounds.
Idioms:
off course
Away from the planned or intended course.
in due course
At the proper or right time: Things will get better in due course.
of course
1. As is to be expected under the circumstances; naturally or obviously: Of course someone had to clean up the mess.
2. Used to indicate assent or agreement: "Do you like her music?" "Of course!"
on course
Following the planned or intended course.
run/take its course
To follow its natural progression or development: Should we let the illness run its course?

[Middle English, from Old French cours, from Latin cursus, from past participle of currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

courses

(ˈkɔːsɪz)
pl n
(Physiology) (sometimes singular) physiol another word for menses
References in classic literature ?
"You are very beautiful to-night," I said, in one of the meditative pauses between the courses.
RESUMING their course on the following morning, Mr.
In that case, of course, people are not spiteful in silence, but moan; but they are not candid moans, they are malignant moans, and the malignancy is the whole point.
Departure from Green River valley Popo Agie Its course The rivers into which it runs Scenery of the Bluffs the great Tar Spring Volcanic tracts in the Crow country Burning Mountain of Powder River Sulphur springs Hidden fires Colter's Hell Wind River Campbell's party Fitzpatrick and his trappers Captain Stewart, an amateur traveller Nathaniel Wyeth Anecdotes of his expedition to the Far West Disaster of Campbell's party A union of bands The Bad Pass The rapids Departure of Fitzpatrick Embarkation of peltries Wyeth and his bull boat Adventures of Captain Bonneville in the Bighorn Mountains Adventures in the plain Traces of Indians Travelling precautions Dangers of making a smoke The rendezvous
"After this I was sent to Tattersall's to be sold; of course I could not be warranted free from vice, so nothing was said about that.
Sweep the room and clean it, of course, after you clear out the trunks and boxes."
The prince gazed affectionately at Colia, who, of course, had come in solely for the purpose of talking about this "gigantic thought."
Of course, when you have mastered the action you are able to do these things without thinking of them, and nothing can be more graceful.
Vernon persevered, however, in the offer of it, and though Lady Susan continued to resist, her resistance in the course of a few days seemed somewhat less formidable.
Why to Honduras, of course! After the idol of gold!
The first question of course was, how to get dry again: they had a consultation about this, and after a few minutes it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
In the course of the next day the first of the usual betrothal visits were exchanged.