court dress


Also found in: Wikipedia.

court dress

n
(Clothing & Fashion) the formal clothing worn at court
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
In his court dress and brilliant array of orders, he was certainly a very distinguished-looking figure.
"Dear Papa: Considering that it is more than three years since you paid Madame Smith last, and that then her bill, which included my court dress, was only L150, I cannot see how I could possibly have been more economical, unless you expect me to go in rags.
Holmes's eyes fixed themselves upon one of them, and following his gaze I saw the picture of a regal and stately lady in Court dress, with a high diamond tiara upon her noble head.
You'll find all the men at Ozma's court dressed just as you are--only perhaps a little finer."
The unanimous judgment rendered today says the Quebec court dress code does not forbid head scarves if they constitute a sincere religious belief and don't harm the public interest.
To wear old-fashioned "court dress" was to risk abuse and arrest as a counter-revolutionary royalist.
He said the uniform of the bar and the bench is prescribed in High Court Rules and Orders, General Chapter under the head Dress of the Advocates appearing I the high courts, Supreme Court Rules 1980 in part 1 under order IV Rule 8 and Supreme Court (Court Dress and Mode of Dress) Order 1980.
Roger Delves-Broughton is a suitably pompous Polonious, in full diplomatic court dress, and Caryl Morgan's Ophelia is a lovesick milksop cipher, until her painfully intense mad scene.
Costume reflected identity and status not only in the colonial system, but in a culture that included Christian, Muslim, and animist faiths and a breathtaking range of ethnic and cultural influences from indigenous hunter-gatherers to Chinese court dress and merchants from India, Arabia, Africa, Southeast Asia, and Europe.
The cover art of the liner notes is charming: a picture of Haydn next to a picture of a featured contemporary composer, Michael Berekely, in the costume court dress of 1787.
As the lawyers were not representing suspects, Diken told them to remove their court dress and move out of the lawyers' seating area.