courtier


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court·i·er

 (kôr′tē-ər, -tyər)
n.
1. An attendant at a sovereign's court.
2. One who seeks favor, especially by insincere flattery or obsequious behavior.

[Middle English courteour, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French cortoier, to be at a royal court, from cort, court; see court.]

courtier

(ˈkɔːtɪə)
n
1. an attendant at a court
2. a person who seeks favour in an ingratiating manner
[C13: from Anglo-French courteour (unattested), from Old French corteier to attend at court]

cour•ti•er

(ˈkɔr ti ər, ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. a person who is often in attendance at the court of a king or other royal personage.
2. a person who flatters.
[1250–1300; Middle English courteour < Anglo-French courte(i)our= Old French cortoy(er) to attend at court (derivative of court court) + Anglo-French -our < Latin -ōr- -or2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereigncourtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereign
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another

courtier

noun attendant, follower, squire, pursuivant (Historical), train-bearer, liegeman (Historical) a courtier who worked in the royal household
Quotations
"The two maxims of any great man at court are, always to keep his countenance, and never to keep his word" [Jonathan Swift Thoughts on Various Subjects]

courtier

noun
One who flatters another excessively:
Informal: apple-polisher.
Translations
مِن حاشِيَة المَلِك
dvořan
hofdamehofmand
udvari emberudvaronc
hirîmaîur
dvoran
saraylı

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] Ncortesano/a m/f

courtier

[ˈkɔːrtɪər] n (= man) → courtisan m (= woman) → dame f de (la) cour

courtier

nHöfling m

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] ncortigiano/a

court

(koːt) noun
1. a place where legal cases are heard. a magistrates' court; the High Court.
2. the judges and officials of a legal court. The accused is to appear before the court on Friday.
3. a marked-out space for certain games. a tennis-court; a squash court.
4. the officials, councillors etc of a king or queen. the court of King James.
5. the palace of a king or queen. Hampton Court.
6. an open space surrounded by houses or by the parts of one house.
verb
1. to try to win the love of; to woo.
2. to try to gain (admiration etc).
3. to seem to be deliberately risking (disaster etc).
ˈcourtier (-tiə) noun
a member of the court of a king or queen. He was one of King James' courtiers.
ˈcourtly adjective
having fine manners.
ˈcourtliness noun
ˈcourtship noun
courting or wooing.
ˈcourthouse noun
a building where legal cases are held.
ˌcourt-ˈmartialplural ˌcourts-ˈmartial noun
a court held by officers of the armed forces to try offences against discipline.
ˈcourtyard noun
a court or enclosed ground beside, or surrounded by, a building. the courtyard of the castle.
References in classic literature ?
The lad departed, prouder of his flowing blood than the vainest courtier could be of his blushing ribbon; and stalked among the fellows of his age, an object of general admiration and envy.
How natural it was for the little courtier to give her a rank.
He introduced himself, smiling a smirky smile borrowed from the courtiers of the stage, extended a fair-skinned talon, and while he gripped my hand in it he bent his body forward three times at the hips, as the stage courtier does, and said in the airiest and most condescending and patronizing way--I quite remember his exact language:
My father is Miss Havisham's cousin; not that that implies familiar intercourse between them, for he is a bad courtier and will not propitiate her.
Yet, as to myself, I must confess, having never been designed for a courtier, either by my birth or education, I was so ill a judge of things, that I could not discover the lenity and favour of this sentence, but conceived it
For a man is not a courtier unless he can do everything.
Robin had not forgot the gentle arts taught by his mother, and he wore his fine red velvet tunic and breeches with the grace of a courtier.
The other, gentle and polished, elegant and nice, attaining his ends by the slow and infallible means of diplomacy, faithful to good taste, was the express image of the old courtier regime.
He was so unworldly and so little of a courtier that when the new Emperor Su Tsung returned in triumph to the capital and appointed him Imperial Censor, he fulfilled his new duties by telling his majesty the whole unpalatable truth in a manner strangely free from ornamental apology, and was promptly rewarded with the exile of a provincial governorship.
de Treville, the elegant and noble courtier, Athos in his most cheerful days might advantageously sustain a comparison.
Sire," replied the courtier, laughing, in order that he might seem to comprehend the quotation, "your majesty may be perfectly right in relying on the good feeling of France, but I fear I am not altogether wrong in dreading some desperate attempt.
Nothing less than the complaisance of a courtier could have borne without anger such treatment; but Sir William's good breeding carried him through it all; and though he begged leave to be positive as to the truth of his information, he listened to all their impertinence with the most forbearing courtesy.