courtier


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court·i·er

 (kôr′tē-ər, -tyər)
n.
1. An attendant at a sovereign's court.
2. One who seeks favor, especially by insincere flattery or obsequious behavior.

[Middle English courteour, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French cortoier, to be at a royal court, from cort, court; see court.]

courtier

(ˈkɔːtɪə)
n
1. an attendant at a court
2. a person who seeks favour in an ingratiating manner
[C13: from Anglo-French courteour (unattested), from Old French corteier to attend at court]

cour•ti•er

(ˈkɔr ti ər, ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. a person who is often in attendance at the court of a king or other royal personage.
2. a person who flatters.
[1250–1300; Middle English courteour < Anglo-French courte(i)our= Old French cortoy(er) to attend at court (derivative of court court) + Anglo-French -our < Latin -ōr- -or2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereigncourtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereign
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another

courtier

noun attendant, follower, squire, pursuivant (Historical), train-bearer, liegeman (Historical) a courtier who worked in the royal household
Quotations
"The two maxims of any great man at court are, always to keep his countenance, and never to keep his word" [Jonathan Swift Thoughts on Various Subjects]

courtier

noun
One who flatters another excessively:
Informal: apple-polisher.
Translations
مِن حاشِيَة المَلِك
dvořan
hofdamehofmand
udvari emberudvaronc
hirîmaîur
dvoran
saraylı

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] Ncortesano/a m/f

courtier

[ˈkɔːrtɪər] n (= man) → courtisan m (= woman) → dame f de (la) cour

courtier

nHöfling m

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] ncortigiano/a

court

(koːt) noun
1. a place where legal cases are heard. a magistrates' court; the High Court.
2. the judges and officials of a legal court. The accused is to appear before the court on Friday.
3. a marked-out space for certain games. a tennis-court; a squash court.
4. the officials, councillors etc of a king or queen. the court of King James.
5. the palace of a king or queen. Hampton Court.
6. an open space surrounded by houses or by the parts of one house.
verb
1. to try to win the love of; to woo.
2. to try to gain (admiration etc).
3. to seem to be deliberately risking (disaster etc).
ˈcourtier (-tiə) noun
a member of the court of a king or queen. He was one of King James' courtiers.
ˈcourtly adjective
having fine manners.
ˈcourtliness noun
ˈcourtship noun
courting or wooing.
ˈcourthouse noun
a building where legal cases are held.
ˌcourt-ˈmartialplural ˌcourts-ˈmartial noun
a court held by officers of the armed forces to try offences against discipline.
ˈcourtyard noun
a court or enclosed ground beside, or surrounded by, a building. the courtyard of the castle.
References in classic literature ?
The spectacle was often repeated with great applause, till on one occasion a courtier, bent on mischief, took from his pocket a handful of nuts and threw them upon the stage.
Well, adorer and courtier of the Emperor Alexander, why don't you say anything?
At dinner, having placed Balashev beside him, Napoleon not only treated him amiably but behaved as if Balashev were one of his own courtiers, one of those who sympathized with his plans and ought to rejoice at his success.
The Lady Henrietta followed the usual progress of pretty women, particularly coquettish women; she passed from caprice to contradiction; -- the gallant had undergone the caprice, the courtier must bend beneath the contradictory humor.
Of this George Herbert was glad, for although he was a good and saintly man, he longed to be a courtier.
Then the seamen, attentive courtiers of the weather, think of regulating the conduct of their ships by the mood of the master.
He struck it, and then it was hit back by the courtiers who were playing with him.
With such precautions the courtiers might bid defiance to contagion.
Recollect, my friend," said Don Quixote, "all knights cannot be courtiers, nor can all courtiers be knights-errant, nor need they be.
While, with smooth and smiling cheek, the courtiers, each in turn, followed their Prince's example, and aimed a shaft of ridicule at Cedric, the face of the Saxon became inflamed with passion, and he glanced his eyes fiercely from one to another, as if the quick succession of so many injuries had prevented his replying to them in turn; or, like a baited bull, who, surrounded by his tormentors, is at a loss to choose from among them the immediate object of his revenge.
At the head of the landing rows of courtiers were collected in magnificent attire, who stared at the queer old figure, and called to her, and explained to her, with every kind of sign, that it was strictly forbidden to mount those steps.
Tense silence fell upon the little company of lords and courtiers as these awful words fell from the lips of a subject, addressed to his king.