courtly love


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

courtly love

n.
An idealized and often illicit form of love celebrated in the literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in which a knight or courtier devotes himself to a noblewoman who is usually married and feigns indifference to preserve her reputation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

courtly love

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a tradition represented in Western European literature between the 12th and the 14th centuries, idealizing love between a knight and a revered (usually married) lady
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

court′ly love′


n.
a highly stylized code of conduct between lovers, often the subject of medieval literature.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courtly love - (Middle Ages) a highly conventionalized code of conduct for lovers
code of behavior, code of conduct - a set of conventional principles and expectations that are considered binding on any person who is a member of a particular group
Dark Ages, Middle Ages - the period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
First associated with Geoffrey Chaucer in the fourteenth century, it gained prominence when the tradition of courtly love thrived in later centuries.
Cliff and Sally's unconventional relationship contrasts with the more courtly love that blossoms between "Cabaret's" secondary couple.
Very few people know this, but the day was first associated with romance in the 14th century, within the circle of author and philosopher Geoffrey Chaucer, when the tradition of courtly love flourished.
Valentine's Day is a day for lovers, based on the feast of a saint believed to have lived in the third century and associated with courtly love but whose historicity is so nebulous the Church removed him from the General Roman Calendar in 1969, leaving his liturgical celebration to local calendars.
Other topics include instructional books on civility, war and the codifying of violence, classic knowledge and courtly love, and knights and religion.
In Austen's exploration of the moral dangers that courtly love presents to women, she reverses the gender roles by having the fair lady show the submissive service traditionally performed by the knight.
That view stands in sharp contrast to, say, that of Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde, which is indifferent to Trojan history because it is more concerned with courtly love than with military history.
The archaic world of courtly love and the contemporary youth culture of hip-hop converge in the compulsion to rhyme: "Dude, if you had a quarter / of my built in dolor / there be virtue in my briar." But Keelan's modern, English-speaking trobairitz do not replicate the ironic awareness she ascribes to "the essential fictionality of their subjective position.
AMUSEUM is marking Valentine's Day by opening up 19th century books depicting cupid and courtly love.
The day first became associated with romantic love in the circle of Geoffrey Chaucer in the High Middle Ages, when the tradition of courtly love flourished.