courtly love


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courtly love

n.
An idealized and often illicit form of love celebrated in the literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in which a knight or courtier devotes himself to a noblewoman who is usually married and feigns indifference to preserve her reputation.

courtly love

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a tradition represented in Western European literature between the 12th and the 14th centuries, idealizing love between a knight and a revered (usually married) lady

court′ly love′


n.
a highly stylized code of conduct between lovers, often the subject of medieval literature.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courtly love - (Middle Ages) a highly conventionalized code of conduct for lovers
code of behavior, code of conduct - a set of conventional principles and expectations that are considered binding on any person who is a member of a particular group
Dark Ages, Middle Ages - the period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
It was an activity in line with both the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development and the 3rd-century Roman Saint Valentines spirit of celebrating inclusion and courtly love.
Cliff and Sally's unconventional relationship contrasts with the more courtly love that blossoms between "Cabaret's" secondary couple.
Very few people know this, but the day was first associated with romance in the 14th century, within the circle of author and philosopher Geoffrey Chaucer, when the tradition of courtly love flourished.
Valentine's Day is a day for lovers, based on the feast of a saint believed to have lived in the third century and associated with courtly love but whose historicity is so nebulous the Church removed him from the General Roman Calendar in 1969, leaving his liturgical celebration to local calendars.
Other topics include instructional books on civility, war and the codifying of violence, classic knowledge and courtly love, and knights and religion.
The word "courtesy" comes from the Old French courteis and refers to genteel politeness and courtly manners, particularly in the code of courtly love.
That view stands in sharp contrast to, say, that of Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde, which is indifferent to Trojan history because it is more concerned with courtly love than with military history.
The archaic world of courtly love and the contemporary youth culture of hip-hop converge in the compulsion to rhyme: "Dude, if you had a quarter / of my built in dolor / there be virtue in my briar.
AMUSEUM is marking Valentine's Day by opening up 19th century books depicting cupid and courtly love.
The sixth and most exciting chapter shows how the movement to legalize divorce and anxieties about the state of marriage led to attempts by doctors to advocate a form of courtly love in marriage to obviate the need for divorce (in ironic contradistinction to the adulterous nature of codified courtly love as exemplified by Lancelot and Guinevere's paradigmatic extramarital passion).
The day first became associated with romantic love in the circle of Geoffrey Chaucer in the High Middle Ages, when the tradition of courtly love flourished.
Even though several of the love poems, especially the urbane and sophisticated pieces influenced by Chaucer, reflect the ideals of courtly love, there is still much among this selection of lyrics that connects with the experience of everyday life.