cousin


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Related to cousin: second cousin, Cousin marriage

cous·in

 (kŭz′ĭn)
n.
1. A child of one's aunt or uncle. Also called first cousin.
2. A relative descended from a common ancestor, such as a grandparent, by two or more steps in a diverging line.
3. A relative by blood or marriage; a kinsman or kinswoman.
4. A member of a kindred group or country: our Canadian cousins.
5. Something similar in quality or character: "There's no mistaking soca for its distant Jamaican cousin, reggae" (Michael Saunders).
6. Used as a form of address by a sovereign in addressing another sovereign or a high-ranking member of the nobility.

[Middle English cosin, a relative, from Old French, from Latin cōnsōbrīnus, cousin : com-, com- + sōbrīnus, cousin on the mother's side; see swesor- in Indo-European roots.]

cous′in·hood′ n.
cous′in·ly adj.
cous′in·ship′ n.

cousin

(ˈkʌzən)
n
1. Also called: first cousin, cousin-german or full cousin the child of one's aunt or uncle
2. a relative who has descended from one of one's common ancestors. A person's second cousin is the child of one of his parents' first cousins. A person's third cousin is the child of one of his parents' second cousins. A first cousin once removed (or loosely second cousin) is the child of one's first cousin
3. a member of a group related by race, ancestry, interests, etc: our Australian cousins.
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a title used by a sovereign when addressing another sovereign or a nobleman
[C13: from Old French cosin, from Latin consōbrīnus cousin, from sōbrīnus cousin on the mother's side; related to soror sister]
ˈcousinˌhood, ˈcousinˌship n
ˈcousinly adj, adv

Cousin

(French kuzɛ̃)
n
(Biography) Victor (viktɔr). 1792–1867, French philosopher and educational reformer

cous•in

(ˈkʌz ən)

n.
1. the son or daughter of an uncle or aunt.
2. one related by descent in a diverging line from a known common ancestor.
3. a kinsman or kinswoman; relative.
4. a person or thing related to another by similar natures, languages, geographical proximity, etc.
5. a term of address used by a sovereign for another sovereign or a high-ranking noble.
[1250–1300; Middle English cosin < Anglo-French co(u)sin, Old French cosin < Latin consōbrīnus cousin (properly, son of one's mother's sister) =con- con- + sōbrīnus second cousin (presumably orig. “pertaining to the sister”) <*swesrīnos=*swesr-, gradational variant of *swesōr (>soror sister) + *-īnos -ine1]
cous′in•ly, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cousin - the child of your aunt or uncle
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
Translations
إبْن أو بِنت العم أو العمّـهاِبْنُ العَمِّ
bratranecsestřenice
kusinefætter
kuzo
serkkusukulainenpikkuserkku
bratić
unokatestvér
frændi eîa frænka
いとこ
사촌
antros eilės pusbrolisantros eilės pusseserėpusbrolispusseserė
brālēnsmāsīca
bratranecsesternica
bratranecsestrična
kusin
ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง
kuzenerkek yeğen
anh em họ

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] Nprimo/a m/f
first cousinprimo/a m/f carnal
second cousinprimo/a m/f segundo/a

cousin

[ˈkʌzən] ncousin(e) m/f first cousin, second cousin

cousin

n (male) → Cousin m, → Vetter m (dated); (female) → Cousine f, → Kusine f, → Base f (old); Kevin and Susan are cousinsKevin und Susan sind Cousin und Cousine

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] ncugino/a

cousin

(ˈkazn) noun
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
first/full cousin
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
second cousin
a child of one's parent's first cousin or a child of one's first cousin.

cousin

اِبْنُ العَمِّ bratranec kusine Cousin ξάδελφος primo serkku cousin bratić cugino いとこ 사촌 neef fetter kuzyn primo двоюродный брат kusin ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง kuzen anh em họ 堂表兄弟姊妹

cousin

n. primo-a.

cousin

n primo -ma mf
References in classic literature ?
Coquenard did not carry his genealogical investigations any further; but withdrawing his anxious look from the chest and fixing it upon Porthos, he contented himself with saying, "Monsieur our cousin will do us the favor of dining with us once before his departure for the campaign, will he not, Madame Coquenard?"
When Marmaduke Temple and his cousin rode through the gate of the former, the heart of the father had been too recently touched with the best feelings of our nature, to leave inclination for immediate discourse.
Sophia had acquainted her cousin with her design to go to London; and Mrs Fitzpatrick had agreed to accompany her; for the arrival of her husband at Upton had put an end to her design of going to Bath, or to her aunt Western.
Scenery of the Way-lee-way A substitute for tobacco Sublime scenery of Snake River The garrulous old chief and his cousin A Nez Perce meeting A stolen skin The scapegoat dog Mysterious conferences The little chief His hospitality The captain's account of the United States His healing skill
One Saturday in March we walked over to Baywater, for a long- talked-of visit to Cousin Mattie Dilke.
The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very well, with much good humour, and no embarrassment, at least on the part of the sons, who, at seventeen and sixteen, and tall of their age, had all the grandeur of men in the eyes of their little cousin. The two girls were more at a loss from being younger and in greater awe of their father, who addressed them on the occasion with rather an injudicious particularity.
Baudoyer, Isidore The Middle Classes Cousin Pons Bianchon, Horace Father Goriot The Atheist's Mass Cesar Birotteau The Commission in Lunacy Lost Illusions A Distinguished Provincial at Paris A Bachelor's Establishment The Secrets of a Princess Pierrette A Study of Woman Scenes from a Courtesan's Life Honorine The Seamy Side of History The Magic Skin A Second Home A Prince of Bohemia Letters of Two Brides The Muse of the Department The Imaginary Mistress The Middle Classes Cousin Betty The Country Parson In addition, M.
Everybody on Sir Leicester Dedlock's side of the question and of his way of thinking would appear to be his cousin more or less.
Even old Lobbs himself, in the very height of his ferocity, couldn't resist the coaxing of his pretty daughter; and when she, and her cousin Kate--an arch, impudent-looking, bewitching little person--made a dead set upon the old man together, as, to say the truth, they very often did, he could have refused them nothing, even had they asked for a portion of the countless and inexhaustible treasures, which were hidden from the light, in the iron safe.
The licentiate said he would get him a cousin of his own, a famous scholar, and one very much given to reading books of chivalry, who would have great pleasure in conducting him to the mouth of the very cave, and would show him the lakes of Ruidera, which were likewise famous all over La Mancha, and even all over Spain; and he assured him he would find him entertaining, for he was a youth who could write books good enough to be printed and dedicated to princes.
Now you must know that a Town Mouse once upon a time went on a visit to his cousin in the country.
Suppose an inquiring gardener, or a restless cousin, should presently loom through the fog, bearing down upon me?