cove


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cove 1

 (kōv)
n.
1. A small sheltered bay in the shoreline of a sea, river, or lake.
2.
a. A recess or small valley in the side of a mountain.
b. A cave or cavern.
3. A narrow gap or pass between hills or woods.
4. Architecture
a. A concave molding.
b. A concave surface forming a junction between a ceiling and a wall. Also called coving.
tr.v. coved, cov·ing, coves
To make in an inward curving form.

[Middle English, chamber, cave, from Old English cofa.]

cove 2

 (kōv)
n. Chiefly British
A fellow; a man.

[Probably from Romani kova, man.]

cove

(kəʊv)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a small bay or inlet, usually between rocky headlands
2. (Geological Science) a narrow cavern formed in the sides of cliffs, mountains, etc, usually by erosion
3. a sheltered place
4. (Architecture) architect Also called: coving a concave curved surface between the wall and ceiling of a room
vb
(Architecture) (tr) to form an architectural cove in
[Old English cofa; related to Old Norse kofi, Old High German kubisi tent]

cove

(kəʊv)
n
1. old-fashioned slang Brit and Austral a fellow; chap
2. (Historical Terms) history Austral an overseer of convict labourers
[C16: probably from Romany kova thing, person]

cove1

(koʊv)

n., v. coved, cov•ing. n.
1. a small indentation or recess in the shoreline of a sea, lake, or river.
2. a sheltered nook.
3. a hollow or recess in a mountain; cavern.
4. a narrow pass or sheltered area between woods or hills.
5. a concave architectural surface or molding, esp. one linking a ceiling and a wall.
v.t., v.i.
6. to make or become a cove.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English cofa cave, den, closet, c. Old Norse kofi hut, Greek gýpē cave]

cove2

(koʊv)

n.
Brit. Slang. a person; fellow.
[1560–70; said to be < Romany kova creature]

cove

- Comes from Old English cofa, "small room," from the Germanic root kubon, and came to mean "small hollow place in coastal rocks," and then "small bay."
See also related terms for small room.

cove


Past participle: coved
Gerund: coving

Imperative
cove
cove
Present
I cove
you cove
he/she/it coves
we cove
you cove
they cove
Preterite
I coved
you coved
he/she/it coved
we coved
you coved
they coved
Present Continuous
I am coving
you are coving
he/she/it is coving
we are coving
you are coving
they are coving
Present Perfect
I have coved
you have coved
he/she/it has coved
we have coved
you have coved
they have coved
Past Continuous
I was coving
you were coving
he/she/it was coving
we were coving
you were coving
they were coving
Past Perfect
I had coved
you had coved
he/she/it had coved
we had coved
you had coved
they had coved
Future
I will cove
you will cove
he/she/it will cove
we will cove
you will cove
they will cove
Future Perfect
I will have coved
you will have coved
he/she/it will have coved
we will have coved
you will have coved
they will have coved
Future Continuous
I will be coving
you will be coving
he/she/it will be coving
we will be coving
you will be coving
they will be coving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coving
you have been coving
he/she/it has been coving
we have been coving
you have been coving
they have been coving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coving
you will have been coving
he/she/it will have been coving
we will have been coving
you will have been coving
they will have been coving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coving
you had been coving
he/she/it had been coving
we had been coving
you had been coving
they had been coving
Conditional
I would cove
you would cove
he/she/it would cove
we would cove
you would cove
they would cove
Past Conditional
I would have coved
you would have coved
he/she/it would have coved
we would have coved
you would have coved
they would have coved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cove - a small inletcove - a small inlet        
inlet, recess - an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)
lough - a long narrow (nearly landlocked) cove in Ireland
2.cove - small or narrow cave in the side of a cliff or mountain
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea

cove

1
noun bay, sound, creek, inlet, bayou, firth or frith (Scot.), anchorage the sandy cove at the north end of the beach

cove

2
noun (Old-fashioned slang) fellow, type, customer, character, bloke (Brit. informal), chap I've always thought of him as a decent old cove.

cove

noun
A body of water partly enclosed by land but having a wide outlet to the sea:
Translations
شَرْم ، خَليج
zátoka
bugtvig
tengeröböl
vík, vogur
įlankėlėužtakis
neliels līcis

cove

1 [kəʊv] N (Geog) → cala f, ensenada f (US) (= valley) → valle m

cove

2 [kəʊv] N (Brit) (o.f.) (= fellow) → tío m

cove

[ˈkəʊv] n (= bay) → crique f, anse f

cove

1
n (Geog) → (kleine) Bucht

cove

2
n (dated Brit inf, = fellow) → Kerl m (inf); odd covekomischer Kauz

cove

[kəʊv] npiccola baia, cala

cove

(kəuv) noun
a small bay or inlet of the sea. They bathed in a quiet cove.
References in classic literature ?
Furthermore, the beach was the head of a narrow rock cove, a quarter of a mile long, up which pent way the sea roared and was subdued at the last to a gentle pulse of surf.
The wind, which had been fresh and raw across the bare hills, gained no entrance to the cove; and the beach was warm and balmy, the air sweetly pungent with the thicket odors.
I had seen a distant headland past the extreme edge of the promontory, and as we looked we could see grow the intervening coastline of what was evidently a deep cove. At the same time there broke upon our ears a continuous and mighty bellowing.
The little fishing village, nestled in the cove where the sand-dunes met the harbor shore, looked like a great opal in the haze.
--As a ship that putteth into the calmest cove:--it now draweth up to the land, weary of long voyages and uncertain seas.
"This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated grog-shop.
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
Don't he look fierce at any strange cove that laughs or sings when he's in company!' pursued the Dodger.
So it was that as the second mate of the Ithaca with his six men waded down the bed of the little stream toward the harbor and the ship, a fleet of ten war prahus manned by over five hundred fierce Dyaks and commanded by Muda Saffir himself, pulled cautiously into the little cove upon the opposite side of the island, and landed but a quarter of a mile from camp.
It pulled up in a small cove close to where he was.
Horror-struck, I hastened to the brink of the abyss just in time to see two splashes upon the surface of the little cove below.
Having noticed that the number indicating the greatest depth was apparently in the centre of the map, I laid a rule on the map lengthwise, and then breadthwise, and found, to my surprise, that the line of greatest length intersected the line of greatest breadth exactly at the point of greatest depth, notwithstanding that the middle is so nearly level, the outline of the pond far from regular, and the extreme length and breadth were got by measuring into the coves; and I said to myself, Who knows but this hint would conduct to the deepest part of the ocean as well as of a pond or puddle?