cover crop

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cover crop

n.
A crop, such as winter rye or clover, planted between periods of regular crop production to prevent erosion and typically turned under before maturity to increase the soil's organic matter and nitrogen content.

cover crop

n
(Agriculture) a crop planted between main crops to prevent leaching or soil erosion or to provide green manure

cov′er crop`


n.
a crop, usu. a legume, planted to keep nutrients from leaching, soil from eroding, and land from weeding over, as during the winter.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cover crop - crop planted to prevent soil erosion and provide green manure
crop - a cultivated plant that is grown commercially on a large scale
References in periodicals archive ?
Utilizing cover crops after moving the pigs out of a paddock provides erosion control while increasing biomass and fertility of the topsoil.
Cover crops are plants that are seeded when a farmer's main crop has finished growing.
Cows, chickens and cover crops do the work instead of plows.
Cover crops are crops that are grown to amend the soil and suppress weeds but aren't usually harvested.
The use of cover crops in vineyards in southern Brazil has increased significantly in recent years, with the aim of reducing erosion as well as improving the chemical, physical, and biological soil quality.
Arable fields left bare over the winter can pollute watercourses but planting cover crops and ensuring drains and ditches are fully functioning can help farmers protect their soils and avoid possible prosecution.
Before summer vacation, Hanson rototilled the grass and planted cover crops over the area, which served as a natural compost.
Cover crops are grown either as part of a two-year rotation with wheat (in the 'wheat-legume' rotations) or as a winter crop in the tomato-corn rotation.
have launched an initiative to promote soil health through the development and adoption of new cover crops across the U.
An onslaught of the weed Palmer amaranth in the southeastern United States has left many farmers with a difficult choice: Should they keep using environmentally friendly cover crops and conservation tillage, allowing Palmer amaranth to cut into their yields, or should they switch to conventional tillage?
When cover crops were used for seven straight seasons, the researchers found, the nitrate levels in the water table dropped by 50 percent or more.
My neighbor asked me what I thought about cover crops and proceeded to tell me that he'd decided to skip the fall chemicals and plant a mix of field peas, turnips, barley, and buckwheat on his failed corn ground.