covetousness


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Related to covetousness: 7 Deadly Sins

cov·et·ous

 (kŭv′ĭ-təs)
adj.
Feeling, expressing, or characterized by a strong or immoderate desire for the possessions of another: "At least three European empires had extended covetous gazes toward the Pacific Northwest" (David A. Bell).

cov′et·ous·ly adv.
cov′et·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.covetousness - an envious eagerness to possess something
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another
2.covetousness - extreme greed for material wealthcovetousness - extreme greed for material wealth  
greed - excessive desire to acquire or possess more (especially more material wealth) than one needs or deserves
3.covetousness - reprehensible acquisitivenesscovetousness - reprehensible acquisitiveness; insatiable desire for wealth (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

covetousness

noun
1. Resentful or painful desire for another's advantages:
2. Excessive desire for more than one needs or deserves:
Informal: grabbiness.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
طَمَـع، جَشَـع
chamtivostchtivost
begærlighedgriskhed
ágirnd
imrenme gıpta etme

covetousness

[ˈkʌvɪtəsnɪs] Ncodicia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

covetousness

nBegierde f (→ of auf +acc), → Begehren nt(of nach)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

covetousness

[ˈkʌvɪtəsnɪs] navidità, brama
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

covet

(ˈkavit) past tense past participle ˈcoveted verb
to desire or wish for eagerly (especially something belonging to someone else). I coveted her fur coat.
ˈcovetous adjective
ˈcovetously adverb
ˈcovetousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Planchet had tasted of riches easily acquired, and was never afterwards likely to stop in his desires; but, as he had a good heart in spite of his covetousness, as he adored D'Artagnan, he could not refrain from making him a thousand recommendations, each more affectionate than the others.
March pressed the white hand that wore the wedding ring, as if asking pardon for her maternal covetousness.
COVETOUSNESS. I am Covetousness, begotten of an old churl, in a leather bag: and, might I now obtain my wish, this house, you, and all, should turn to gold, that I might lock you safe into my chest: O my sweet gold!
Certainly my offer does not sound very magnificent, but it was great to me, for at his words a wave of covetousness had swept over my heart, and I almost felt as if the seventy-nine camels that were left were nothing in comparison.
His eyes shone with covetousness at the sight of the animal.
This coat of many colors had excited the admiration, and inflamed the covetousness of both warriors and squaws, to an extravagant degree.
The Earldom of Envy, the Kingdom of Covetousness, the Isle of Usury were granted as marriage gifts to the pair.
His thought returned to the earth, his looks perceptibly hardened, his brow contracted, his mouth assuming an expression of undaunted courage; again his looks became fixed, but this time they wore a worldly expression, hardened by covetousness, pride, and strong desire.
Huntingdon had died intestate or not; and I would sooner die than ask him, lest he should misconstrue into covetousness my desire to know.
Having been sent to Delphi with a large sum of gold for distribution among the citizens, he was so provoked at their covetousness that he refused to divide the money, and sent it back to his master.
He looked astonished at the expression my face assumed during a brief second: it was not horror, it was covetousness. He snatched the pistol back, jealously; shut the knife, and returned it to its concealment.
I left home and wife and children to come and serve your worship, trusting to do better and not worse; but as covetousness bursts the bag, it has rent my hopes asunder, for just as I had them highest about getting that wretched unlucky island your worship has so often promised me, I see that instead and in lieu of it you mean to desert me now in a place so far from human reach: for God's sake, master mine, deal not so unjustly by me, and if your worship will not entirely give up attempting this feat, at least put it off till morning, for by what the lore I learned when I was a shepherd tells me it cannot want three hours of dawn now, because the mouth of the Horn is overhead and makes midnight in the line of the left arm."