covet

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cov·et

 (kŭv′ĭt)
v. cov·et·ed, cov·et·ing, cov·ets
v.tr.
1. To feel strong or immoderate desire for (that which is another's).
2. To wish for (something) longingly. See Synonyms at desire.
v.intr.
To covet that which is another's.

[Middle English coveiten, from Old French coveitier, from covitie, desire, from Latin cupiditās, from cupidus, desirous, from cupere, to desire.]

cov′et·a·ble adj.
cov′et·er n.
cov′et·ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

covet

(ˈkʌvɪt)
vb (tr) , -vets, -veting or -veted
to wish, long, or crave for (something, esp the property of another person)
[C13: from Old French coveitier, from coveitié eager desire, ultimately from Latin cupiditās cupidity]
ˈcovetable adj
ˈcoveter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cov•et

(ˈkʌv ɪt)

v.t.
1. to desire wrongfully, inordinately, or without due regard for the rights of others: to covet another's property.
2. to wish for, esp. eagerly.
v.i.
3. to have an inordinate or wrongful desire.
[1175–1225; Middle English coveiten < Anglo-French coveiter, Old French coveit(i)er < Vulgar Latin *cupidiētāre, v. derivative of *cupidiētās, for Latin cupiditās cupidity]
cov′et•er, n.
cov′et•ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

covet


Past participle: coveted
Gerund: coveting

Imperative
covet
covet
Present
I covet
you covet
he/she/it covets
we covet
you covet
they covet
Preterite
I coveted
you coveted
he/she/it coveted
we coveted
you coveted
they coveted
Present Continuous
I am coveting
you are coveting
he/she/it is coveting
we are coveting
you are coveting
they are coveting
Present Perfect
I have coveted
you have coveted
he/she/it has coveted
we have coveted
you have coveted
they have coveted
Past Continuous
I was coveting
you were coveting
he/she/it was coveting
we were coveting
you were coveting
they were coveting
Past Perfect
I had coveted
you had coveted
he/she/it had coveted
we had coveted
you had coveted
they had coveted
Future
I will covet
you will covet
he/she/it will covet
we will covet
you will covet
they will covet
Future Perfect
I will have coveted
you will have coveted
he/she/it will have coveted
we will have coveted
you will have coveted
they will have coveted
Future Continuous
I will be coveting
you will be coveting
he/she/it will be coveting
we will be coveting
you will be coveting
they will be coveting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coveting
you have been coveting
he/she/it has been coveting
we have been coveting
you have been coveting
they have been coveting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coveting
you will have been coveting
he/she/it will have been coveting
we will have been coveting
you will have been coveting
they will have been coveting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coveting
you had been coveting
he/she/it had been coveting
we had been coveting
you had been coveting
they had been coveting
Conditional
I would covet
you would covet
he/she/it would covet
we would covet
you would covet
they would covet
Past Conditional
I would have coveted
you would have coveted
he/she/it would have coveted
we would have coveted
you would have coveted
they would have coveted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.covet - wish, long, or crave for (something, especially the property of another person); "She covets her sister's house"
begrudge, envy - be envious of; set one's heart on
drool, salivate - be envious, desirous, eager for, or extremely happy about something; "She was salivating over the raise she anticipated"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

covet

verb long for, desire, fancy (informal), envy, crave, aspire to, yearn for, thirst for, begrudge, hanker after, lust after, set your heart on, have your eye on, would give your eyeteeth for She coveted his job so openly that conversations between them were tense.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

covet

verb
1. To feel envy towards or for:
2. To have a strong longing for:
Informal: hone.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَطْمَـع بِ، يَشتَهـي
prahnout po
tragte efter
ágirnast
geistigodžiaipavydumaspavyduspavydžiai
iekārottīkot
gözü kalmakimrenmek

covet

[ˈkʌvɪt] VTcodiciar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

covet

[ˈkʌvɪt] vt (= envy) → convoiter
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

covet

vtbegehren
vibegehrlich or begierig sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

covet

[ˈkʌvɪt] vtconcupire, bramare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

covet

(ˈkavit) past tense past participle ˈcoveted verb
to desire or wish for eagerly (especially something belonging to someone else). I coveted her fur coat.
ˈcovetous adjective
ˈcovetously adverb
ˈcovetousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
And again the Holy Thern on watch, should he see a victim he covets, often tramples upon the rights of the unreasoning brutes of the valley and takes his prize by foul means if he cannot gain it by fair.
Jupiter replied, "It is lest we should seem to covet the honor for the fruit." But said Minerva, "Let anyone say what he will the olive is more dear to me on account of its fruit." Then said Jupiter, "My daughter, you are rightly called wise; for unless what we do is useful, the glory of it is vain."
It is men of this station also who will be best assured of safety and protection; for they will neither covet what belongs to others, as the poor do; nor will others covet what is theirs, as the poor do what belongs to the rich; and thus, without plotting against any one, or having any one plot against them, they will live free from danger: for which reason Phocylides wisely wishes for the middle state, as being most productive of happiness.
Thwackum was encouraged to the undertaking by reflecting that to covet your neighbour's sister is nowhere forbidden: and he knew it was a rule in the construction of all laws, that " Expressum facit cessare tacitum.
I was a child and She was a child, In this kingdom by the sea, But we loved with a love that was more than love - I and my ANNABEL LEE - With a love that the wingéd seraphs of Heaven Coveted her and me.
Coquenard; the coffer so much coveted contained eight hundred thousand livres.
There was no resisting this appeal; the captain, forthwith, furnished the coveted supply of powder and ball; but at the same time, put spurs to his very fine gift-horse, and the first trial of his speed was to get out of all further manifestation of friendship, on the part of the affectionate old patriarch and his insinuating family.
To be Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs to the greatest power which the world had as yet known must certainly seem, on paper, to be as brilliant a post as a man's ambition could covet. Many years ago it had seemed so to Bransome himself.
Rich, respected, fairly well educated and of sound health--with many other advantages usually valued by those having them and coveted by those who have them not--I sometimes think that I should be less unhappy if they had been denied me, for then the contrast between my outer and my inner life would not be continually demanding a painful attention.