coward


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Related to coward: Noel Coward

coward

a person who lacks courage; very fearful or timid; craven; dastard: She was too much of a coward to go out after dark.
Not to be confused with:
cowered – cringed, recoiled, crouched as in fear: The puppy cowered in the corner.

cow·ard

 (kou′ərd)
n.
One who shows ignoble fear in the face of danger or pain.

[Middle English, from Old French couard, from coue, tail, from Latin cauda.]

cow′ard adj.
Word History: A coward is one who "turns tail." The word comes from Old French couart, coart, "coward," and is related to Italian codardo, "coward." Couart is formed from coe, a northern French dialectal variant of cue, "tail" (from Latin cōda), to which the derogatory suffix -ard was added. This suffix appears in bastard, laggard, and sluggard, to name a few. In heraldry a lion couard, "cowardly lion," was depicted with his tail between his legs. So a coward may be one with his tail hidden between his legs or one who turns tail and runs like a rabbit, with his tail showing.

coward

(ˈkaʊəd)
n
a person who shrinks from or avoids danger, pain, or difficulty
[C13: from Old French cuard, from coue tail, from Latin cauda; perhaps suggestive of a frightened animal with its tail between its legs]

Coward

(ˈkaʊəd)
n
(Biography) Sir Noël (Pierce). 1899–1973, English dramatist, actor, and composer, noted for his sophisticated comedies, which include Private Lives (1930) and Blithe Spirit (1941)

cow•ard

(ˈkaʊ ərd)

n.
1. a person who shows shameful lack of courage or fortitude.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a coward.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French couard-, couart cowardly, derivative of coue tail < Latin cauda]

Cow•ard

(ˈkaʊ ərd)

n.
Noel, 1899–1973, English playwright.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coward - a person who shows fear or timiditycoward - a person who shows fear or timidity
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
cur - a cowardly and despicable person
dastard - a despicable coward
craven, poltroon, recreant - an abject coward
trembler, quaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fear
shrinking violet, shy person - someone who shrinks from familiarity with others
milksop, Milquetoast, pantywaist, pansy - a timid man or boy considered childish or unassertive
hesitater, hesitator, vacillator, waverer - one who hesitates (usually out of fear)
2.Coward - English dramatist and actor and composer noted for his witty and sophisticated comedies (1899-1973)

coward

noun wimp, chicken (slang), scaredy-cat (informal), sneak, funk (informal), craven (informal), pussy (slang, chiefly U.S.), yellow-belly (slang), poltroon The man's just a lily-livered coward.
Quotations
"Cowards die many times before their deaths" [William Shakespeare Julius Caesar]
"coward: one who in a perilous emergency thinks with his legs" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"May coward shame distain his name,"
"The wretch that dares not die!" [Robert Burns McPherson's Farewell]
"All men would be cowards if they durst" [John Wilmot A Satire against Mankind]

coward

noun
An ignoble, uncourageous person:
Translations
جَبانجَبَان
zbabělec
bangebukskujon
pelkuri
kukavica
gyáva
hugleysingi
臆病者
겁쟁이
bailumas
ģļēvulis
strahopetec
fegismes
คนขี้ขลาด
người nhút nhát

coward

[ˈkaʊəd] Ncobarde mf

coward

[ˈkaʊərd] nlâche mf
She's a coward → C'est une lâche.

coward

nFeigling m

coward

[ˈkaʊəd] nvigliacco/a

coward

(ˈkauəd) noun
a person who shows fear easily or is easily frightened. I am such a coward – I hate going to the dentist.
ˈcowardly adjective
ˈcowardice (-dis) noun
ˈcowardliness noun

coward

جَبَان zbabělec kujon Feigling δειλός cobarde pelkuri lâche kukavica codardo 臆病者 겁쟁이 lafaard feiging tchórz covarde трус fegis คนขี้ขลาด korkak người nhút nhát 胆小鬼

coward

a. cobarde, pusilánime.
References in classic literature ?
No one would think of biting such a little thing, except a coward like me," continued the Lion sadly.
"Negore, the Coward," he heard Illiha, a young woman, laugh, and Sun-ne, his sister's daughter, laughed with her.
but base little Pip, he died a coward; died all a'shiver; --out upon Pip!
If you love Latin, I will repeat you some fine lines out of Horace, which would inspire courage into a coward.
Can you pity my weakness if I confess to having felt a pang at my heart when I read that part of your letter which calls Frank a coward and a villain?
Perhaps I was the only one in the office who fancied that I was a coward and a slave, and I fancied it just because I was more highly developed.
Some with a flattering word, The coward does it with a kiss,
"Death loves a coward," said the Bear, and went forward to fight the flood.
Acknowledge, that if Albert is brave, he cannot be a coward; he must then have had some reason for acting as he did this morning, and confess that his conduct is more heroic than otherwise."
Where my jeddak leads I will follow, nor may any jeddak call me a coward or a craven unless I refuse to go where he dares to go.
Except a creature be part coward, it is not a compliment to say it is brave; it is merely a loose misapplication of the word.
Where attempts have not been made to reconcile the two moralities, they may be described as follows:--All is GOOD in the noble morality which proceeds from strength, power, health, well-constitutedness, happiness, and awfulness; for, the motive force behind the people practising it is "the struggle for power." The antithesis "good and bad" to this first class means the same as "noble" and "despicable." "Bad" in the master-morality must be applied to the coward, to all acts that spring from weakness, to the man with "an eye to the main chance," who would forsake everything in order to live.