cowherd

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cow·herd

 (kou′hûrd′)
n.
One who herds or tends cattle.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cowherd

(ˈkaʊˌhɜːd)
n
(Agriculture) a person employed to tend cattle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cow•herd

(ˈkaʊˌhɜrd)

n.
a person who tends cows.
[before 1000]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowherd - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horsebackcowherd - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horseback
buckaroo, buckeroo, vaquero - local names for a cowboy (`vaquero' is used especially in southwestern and central Texas and `buckaroo' is used especially in California)
cowgirl - a woman cowboy
gaucho - a cowboy of the South American pampas
horse wrangler, wrangler - a cowboy who takes care of the saddle horses
ranch hand - a hired hand on a ranch
roper - a cowboy who uses a lasso to rope cattle or horses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بقّار، راعي بقر
ošetřovatel krav
cowboykodriver
kúahirîir
ošetrovateľ kráv
sığır çobanı

cowherd

[ˈkaʊhɜːd] Npastor(a) m/f de ganado, vaquero/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cowherd

[ˈkaʊˌhɜːd] nvaccaro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cow1

(kau) noun
1. the female of cattle used for giving milk. He has ten cows and a bull.
2. the female of certain other animals eg the elephant, whale.
ˈcowboy noun
in the United States, a man who looks after cattle on a ranch.
ˈcowherd noun
a person who looks after cows.
ˈcowhide noun, adjective
(of) the skin of a cow made into leather. a bag made of cowhide; a cowhide bag.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The June baby, who is two feet square and valiant beyond her size and years, seized a stick much bigger than herself and went after the cows, the cowherd being nowhere to be seen.
I thought of course that somebody had stolen them-- some boy from the village, or perhaps the chastised cowherd. But looking about I saw one perched high up in the branches of the beech tree, and then to my dismay one lying dead on the ground.
After wandering about for a long time, they found in a pasture near Finchley a poor shed, with walls of mud, and roof of grass and brambles, built for some cowherd, but now deserted.
Moreau had a huge cowherd's horn slung over his shoulder.
The children used to pelt her with mud; so she begged to be taken on as assistant cowherd, but the cowherd would not have her.
The cowherd girls, picking up their petticoats, ran splashing through the mud with bare legs, still white, not yet brown from the sun, waving brush wood in their hands, chasing the calves that frolicked in the mirth of spring.
He was reacting to a series of incidents in which so called cow vigilantes had attacked Muslim animal traders and cowherds in Rajasthan, Jammu, Delhi and Jharkhand.
Ever so often, from our window, we could see cowherds playing hide- andseek in the meadows above.
According to the legend, that a group of boys, all cowherds, would playfully dress up as girls and offer flowers and a coconut dish "kottan" to a stone they considered as a goddess.
The Samar, Samadi, the Vad (Banyan) the peepul and the mango trees are worshipped by the Rani Paraj people along with a stone cave known as Goval dev (the god of the cowherds).
It is said that when Krishna was a boy, he and other young cowherds formed a pyramid to get to food that their mothers had hung beyond their reach.