cowpuncher


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cow·punch·er

 (kou′pŭn′chər)
n.
A cowboy or a cowgirl.

cowpuncher

(ˈkaʊˌpʌntʃə) or

cowpoke

n
(Agriculture) US and Canadian informal words for cowboy

cow•punch•er

(ˈkaʊˌpʌn tʃər)

n.
a cowboy or cowgirl.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowpuncher - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horsebackcowpuncher - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horseback
buckaroo, buckeroo, vaquero - local names for a cowboy (`vaquero' is used especially in southwestern and central Texas and `buckaroo' is used especially in California)
cowgirl - a woman cowboy
gaucho - a cowboy of the South American pampas
horse wrangler, wrangler - a cowboy who takes care of the saddle horses
ranch hand - a hired hand on a ranch
roper - a cowboy who uses a lasso to rope cattle or horses
References in periodicals archive ?
To them, the Romantic Hero was no longer the knight, the wandering poet, the cowpuncher, the aviator, nor the brave young district attorney, but the great sales-manager, who had an Analysis of Merchandizing Problems on his glass-topped desk, whose title of nobility was "Go-getter," and who devoted himself and all his young samurai to the cosmic purpose of Selling--not of selling anything in particular, for or to anybody in particular, but pure Selling.
In the introduction to his 1902 novel, he wrote, "What is become of the horseman, the cowpuncher, the last romantic figure upon our soil?
And then, if my cooking is not so complete, You cannot blame me for wanting to eat, But show me a man, boys, that sleeps more profound Than this big cowpuncher who sleeps on the ground.
Teddy Blue, who wrote his memoirs with the help of ghost writer Helena Huntingdon Smith, under the title We Pointed Them North: Recollection of a Cowpuncher.
LAL Cowpuncher Committee formed to "ride herd" on all implosion work.
After graduating from the University of Wyoming he became a cowpuncher before breaking into Broadway and films.
A COLORED COWPUNCHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO ROPE AND I CONTRIBUTED TO HIM AND HIS WIFE, AND WENT AWAY OUT MY WAY TO DRIVE BY AND SEE THEM EVER[Y] TIME I WENT TO MY OLD HOME IN OKLA, UP TO THE TIME OF THEIR DEATH, HE NEVER WORKED FOR A SOUL DURING HIS WHOLE LONG [L]IFETIME BUT US.
He urges Americans to reclaim the cowboy as America's knight: "What is become of the horseman, the cowpuncher, the last romantic figure upon our soil?