coxswain


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cox·swain

 (kŏk′sən, -swān′)
n.
1. A person who usually steers a ship's boat and has charge of its crew.
2. A person in a racing shell who usually directs the rest of the crew.
intr. & tr.v. cox·swained, cox·swain·ing, cox·swains
To act as coxswain or serve as coxswain for.

[Middle English cokswaynne : cok, cockboat; see cockboat + swain, servant; see swain.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

coxswain

(ˈkɒksən; -ˌsweɪn)
n
(Nautical Terms) the helmsman of a lifeboat, racing shell, etc. Also called: cockswain
[C15: from cock a ship's boat + swain]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cox•swain

or cock•swain

(ˈkɒk sən, -ˌsweɪn)

n.
1. the steersman of a racing shell.
2. a person in charge of a ship's boat and who usu. steers it.
[1425–75; late Middle English cokeswayne. See cockboat, swain]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

coxswain

- Originally a servant (swain) whose job it was to steer a boat (cock or cockboat).
See also related terms for steer.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

coxswain

A person in charge of a small craft (in the Army, a Class B or smaller craft) who often functions as the helmsman. For a causeway ferry, the pilot is in charge with the coxswain performing helmsman functions. See causeway.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coxswain - the helmsman of a ship's boat or a racing crewcoxswain - the helmsman of a ship's boat or a racing crew
helmsman, steerer, steersman - the person who steers a ship
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قائِد دفّـهمُوجّـه القارِب
kormidelníkvelitel člunu
kvartermesterstyrmand
stÿrimaîurstÿrimaîur, bátstjóri
vairininkasvalties vyresnysis
komandas vecākaisstūrmanis
veliteľ člnu
astsubaydümenciserdümen

coxswain

[ˈkɒksn] Ntimonel mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

coxswain

[ˈkɒksən] n [lifeboat] → timonier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

coxswain

n
(in rowing) = cox N
(Naut: of lifeboat etc) → Boot(s)führer m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

coxswain

[ˈkɒksən] nnocchiere m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

coxswain

(ˈkoksn) noun
1. (often abbreviated to cox (koks) ) a person who steers a (small, usually racing) boat.
2. a petty officer in charge of a boat and crew.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Six oarsmen took their seats, and the coxswain went to the tiller.
The sailors rowed on, and the coxswain made for the floating barrel.
And the coxswain, Israel Hands, was a careful, wily, old, experienced seaman who could be trusted at a pinch with almost anything.
"Now," said he, "when honest Craeke sounds his coxswain's whistle, it will be a signal of his being clear of the crowd, and of his having reached the other side of the pond.
"Well," said the captain, "if you are all of this mind, let me go on shore and talk with him." So away he came to me with this account, a little after the message had been brought to me from the coxswain.
The gig was already lowered, and in it were four oarsmen and a coxswain. The traveller descended, and instead of sitting down at the stern of the boat, which had been decorated with a blue carpet for his accommodation, stood up with his arms crossed.
As for you, coxswain, these are your orders; attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away from these steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you the slip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will be the death of us.'
Benjamin Pump was invariably the coxswain and net caster of Richard’s boat, unless the sheriff saw fit to preside in person: and, on the present occasion, Billy Kirby, and a youth of about half his strength, were assigned to the oars.
Came the sound of paddles, and, next, emerging into the lantern's area of light, the high, black bow of a war canoe, curved like a gondola, inlaid with silvery-glistening mother-of-pearl; the long lean length of the canoe which was without outrigger; the shining eyes and the black-shining bodies of the stark blacks who knelt in the bottom and paddled; Ishikola, the old chief, squatting amidships and not paddling, an unlighted, empty-bowled, short-stemmed clay pipe upside-down between his toothless gums; and, in the stern, as coxswain, the dandy, all nakedness of blackness, all whiteness of decoration, save for the pig's tail in one ear and the scarlet hibiscus that still flamed over the other ear.
Immediately the boat was hauled up, the cook mad his fire; two others pitched the tent; the coxswain hande the things out of the boat; the rest carried them up to th tents and collected firewood.
I passed heavily under the curtain which the Malay coxswain of the harbour launch raised for me.
All round the neighborhood he was known, far and wide, as "the admiral's coxswain." His name was Mazey.