coy

(redirected from coyer)
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coy

 (koi)
adj. coy·er, coy·est
1.
a. Affectedly and often flirtatiously shy or modest: "I pictured myself as some sylvan deity, and she a coy wood nymph of whom I was in pursuit" (Washington Irving).
b. Characterized by or suggesting such shyness or modesty: "How absurd I must have looked standing there before him ... a coy little simper on my foolish young face" (Jane Avrich).
2. Unwilling to make a commitment or divulge information: "As a child, when I asked my mother her age she was coy and evasive" (Lynne Sharon Schwartz).
3. Tending to avoid people and social situations; reserved: "The children were staring up at him, too coy to question him and too curious not to stare" (Edwidge Danticat).

[Middle English, from Old French quei, coi, quiet, still, from Vulgar Latin *quētus, from Latin quiētus, past participle of quiēscere, to rest; see kweiə- in Indo-European roots.]

coy′ly adv.
coy′ness n.

coy

(kɔɪ)
adj
1. (usually of a woman) affectedly demure, esp in a playful or provocative manner
2. shy; modest
3. evasive, esp in an annoying way
[C14: from Old French coi reserved, from Latin quiētus quiet]
ˈcoyish adj
ˈcoyishly adv
ˈcoyishness n
ˈcoyly adv
ˈcoyness n

coy

(kɔɪ)

adj. coy•er, coy•est.
1. artfully or affectedly shy or reserved; coquettish.
2. shy; modest.
3. reluctant to reveal one's plans, make a commitment, or take a stand.
4. Obs. quiet; reserved.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French coi, quoy calm, Old French quei < Vulgar Latin *quētus, for Latin quiētus quiet1]
coy′ish, adj.
coy′ly, adv.
coy′ness, n.

coy

, quiet - Coy and quiet derive from Latin quietus, "at rest, in repose," with coy coming from the Old French form coi (earlier quei), and quiet coming straight from Latin; the original sense of coy was "quiet, still."
See also related terms for quiet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.coy - affectedly modest or shy especially in a playful or provocative way
modest - not offensive to sexual mores in conduct or appearance
2.coy - showing marked and often playful or irritating evasiveness or reluctance to make a definite or committing statement; "a politician coy about his intentions"
indefinite - vague or not clearly defined or stated; "must you be so indefinite?"; "amorphous blots of color having vague and indefinite edges"; "he would not answer so indefinite a proposal"
3.coy - modestly or warily rejecting approaches or overtures; "like a wild young colt, very inquisitive but very coy and not to be easily cajoled"
timid - showing fear and lack of confidence

coy

adjective
1. modest, retiring, shy, shrinking, arch, timid, self-effacing, demure, flirtatious, bashful, prudish, skittish, coquettish, kittenish, overmodest She was modest without being coy.
modest forward, bold, brash, saucy, pushy (informal), brazen, shameless, pert, brassy (informal), impertinent, impudent, brass-necked (Brit. informal), flip (informal)
2. uncommunicative, mum, secretive, reserved, quiet, silent, evasive, taciturn, unforthcoming, tight-lipped, close-lipped The hotel are understandably coy about the incident.

coy

adjective
1. Not forward but reticent or reserved in manner:
2. Given to flirting:
Translations
خَجول
stydlivýupejpavý
koket
szemérmes
sem er ekki jafn feiminn og hann lætur
apsimestinai droviaiapsimestinai drovusapsimestinis drovumaskukliaikuklumas
biklskautrīgs
hanblivý

coy

[kɔɪ] ADJ (coyer (compar) (coyest (superl)))
1. (= demure) [person, smile] → tímido (pej) (= coquettish) → coqueta, coquetón
2. (= evasive) → esquivo, reticente

coy

[ˈkɔɪ] adj
(= shy) [person] → faussement effarouché(e), faussement timide
(= coquettish) [smile] → séducteur/trice
(= reticent) → évasif/ive
to be coy over sth, to be coy about sth → être évasif/ive à propos de qch

coy

adj (+er) (= affectedly shy)verschämt; (= coquettish)neckisch, kokett; (= evasive)zurückhaltend; to be coy about something (= shy)in Bezug auf etw (acc)verschämt tun; (= evasive)sich ausweichend zu etw äußern

coy

[kɔɪ] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (affectedly shy, person) → che fa il/la vergognoso/a; (smile) → falsamente timido/a; (evasive) → evasivo/a; (coquettish) → civettuolo/a

coy

(koi) adjective
(pretending to be) shy. She gave her brother's friend a coy smile.
ˈcoyly adverb
ˈcoyness noun
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Sarkis, however, is coyer about the app's future, saying:
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A large body of research suggests that family members often play an important role in the lives of those who abuse alcohol and other drugs (see Berry and Sellman 2001, Blum 1972, Coyer 2001, Kaufman 1985, O'Farrell and Fals-Stewart 1999, Rossow 2001, Stanton 1985, Velleman 1992, Velleman et al.