cozener


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coz·en

 (kŭz′ən)
v. coz·ened, coz·en·ing, coz·ens
v.tr.
1. To mislead by means of a petty trick or fraud; deceive.
2. To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
3. To obtain by deceit or persuasion.
v.intr.
To act deceitfully.

[Probably ultimately (perhaps via Middle English cosin, fraud, trickery) from Old French cosson, middleman, trader, or obsolete Italian cozzonare, to cheat (from Italian cozzone, horse-trader), both ultimately from Latin cōciō, coctiō, dealer, perhaps of Etruscan origin.]

coz′en·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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cozener

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Verily, ye fill your mouth with noble words: and we are to believe that your heart overfloweth, ye cozeners?
The usurer hangs the cozener' (King Lear 4.6.148-50, 159).
(39.) Philip Stubbes in The Anatomy of Abuses, lists the many ways in which the detractors of theater believed that theatregoers would"learn falsehood" by surrendering to the "cozener's trick" of the actors.
(106) Yet this is not the random misappropriation of the cozener; rather, it constitutes an act of violence against the line.